A Global Perspective Spring 2015

A Global Perspective Spring 2015
LEARNING GUIDE
School of Social Sciences and Psychology
Please read this document and the accompanying SSAPguide very carefully for everything you need to know about the unit.
If you need help, check both (and your unit vUWS site) first. If you still need help, please contact us as per Section 2.1 of the SSAPguide.
Unit Weekly Schedule Follows on next page for your convenience
Section 1: Unit Information
• Unit code and name
• Unit coordinator
• Credit points
• Teaching session
• Welcome and key contacts
• Consultation arrangements
• Requirements other than those listed below
• Improvements made recently to unit
• Delivery: How unit is delivered
• Attendance requirements
• Textbook
• Essential readings
• Other resources
• Referencing requirements
Section 2: Assessment Information
• Course learning outcomes
• Unit learning outcomes
• How unit outcomes relate to course outcomes
• Assessment summary
• Assessment details: Full details for each assessment item
Section 3: Learning and Teaching Activities See Page 2
Section 4: Learning Resources See Section 1 for Texbook, Readings etc.
• Literacy and/or numeracy resources
Section 5: Expectations Of and By You See SSAPguide
UNIT REQUIREMENTS
Internet Access: You must have internet access for this unit, preferably high speed broadband (or use University facilities)
vUWS: You must access the unit vUWS site at least twice a week to check for any new content or announcements
iPad: Owning an iPad is strongly recommended, as some units are optimised for iPad
FREE ADOBE READER: This Learning Guide is an Adobe PDF document with internal attachments. To access attachments you may need
to download and open it in latest FREE Adobe Reader, available at http://get.adobe.com/reader/
You MUST use free Adobe reader app to access attachments on iPad.
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 1 of 16
Unit Weekly Schedule
(Link to Handbook and timetable for unit: http://handbook.uws.edu.au/hbook/unit.aspx?unit=101905)
Week Starts Lecture and Lecturer Tutorial Reading Assessment
1
20/7/2015
Introduction to Indigenous
Cultures: A Global Perspective No tutorial No readings
Assessment 3 (reflective
journal entries)
commence.
2
27/7/2015
Understanding Colonialism &
Post colonialism Interrogating colonial encounters Said, E. W. (1994)
Loomba, A. (2002)
3
3/8/2015
Autonomy, selfdetermination
and indigenous politics
LECTURE ONLINE
Indigenous voice and the politics
of postcoloniality
TUTORIAL
ACTIVITIES ONLINE
Glauser, B. (2011)
MoretonRobinson,
A.
(2004)
4
10/8/2015
Representation 1:
Indigeneity in film
Analysing filmic representations of
contemporary indigenous life:
Australia and NZ compared
Samson and Delilah (to
be watched at home –
on vUWS in
preparation for class)
5
17/8/2015
Globalisation and
contemporary indigenous
identities and cultures
LECTURE ONLINE
Living culture and keeping culture
alive TUTORIAL ACTIVITIES ONLINE
Lucero, N. (2013)
Paradies, Y.C. (2006)
6
24/8/2015
Representation 2:
Indigenous art, culture and
heritage
Culture for sale?: examining the
politics and ethics of cultural
heritage
Hendry, J. (2010)
Meekison, L. (2000)
7
31/8/2015
Consuming Indigeneity:
Tourism and the exotic Other
Indigenous Tourism: weighing the
pros and cons
Hendry, J. (2010)
Meekison, L.Hall, M.
(2012) Holman, C.
(2011)
8
7/9/2015
NO LECTURE: SELF GUIDED
FIELDTRIP
NO TUTORIAL: SELF GUIDED FIELD
TRIP
No readings
Essay (Assessment 1) due
by 5PM Friday,
11th September 2015
9
14/9/2015 SESSION BREAK NO LECTURES OR TUTORIALS
10
21/9/2015
Indigenous relationships with
the land The politics of land management
Scherl, L.M. & Edwards,
S. (2007) Gulson, K.N.
and Parkes,
11
28/10/2015
NO LECTURE: SELF GUIDED
FIELDTRIP
NO TUTORIAL: SELF GUIDED FIELD
TRIP
No readings
12
5/10/2015
Indigenous futures:
sustainability, development
and selfdetermination
Heritage, tourism, urban
planning, land use and
development: interrogating the
interconnections and overlaps
Goodwin, H. (2012)
Radcliffe, S. A., Laurie,
N. and Andolina, R.
(2009)
All final journal entries
must be made before the
week 12 tutorials
13
12/10/2015
GROUP PRESENTATIONS
(Assessment 2 due in class) GROUP PRESENTATIONS No readings
14
19/10/2015
GROUP PRESENTATIONS
(Assessment 2 due in class) GROUP PRESENTATIONS No readings
Final journal reflections
(Assessment 3) due by
5pm Friday 23rd October
2015
15
26/10/2015 STUVAC Student exam study vacation
1618
2/11/2015 FORMAL EXAMINATION PERIOD
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 2 of 16
SECTION ONE: Unit Information
Unit Number 101905
Unit Name 101905Indigenous
Cultures: A Global Perspective
Unit Coordinator Emily Burns
Credit Points 10
Session Spring 2015
Introduction
Ms. Emily Burns
Attachments in this document are:
• SSAPguide
This is a VERY important attachment that forms part of the Learning Guide.
Please read it VERY carefully as it has lots of important information,
including how to contact the School, and all the requirements regarding
assessments (requesting an extension, Special Consideration, late
penalties, etc.)
Consultation
By appointment, please email Emily Burns emily.
burns@uws.edu.au
Improvements
This is a new Unit
Requirements
Enrolment restrictions:
60 credit points of completed study in Social Sciences
Essential equipment:
As this unit incorporates both facetoface
and online learning activities you must
have access to the internet, preferably high speed broadband. You can access the
IT computer laboratories if you do not have this access at home.
Online requirements:
Regular access to the unit’s vUWS site is essential. Students need to check each of
their vUWS sites and their student email accounts at least every 2 or 3 days.
These mediums will be used to communicate (as necessary) announcements, new
unit materials, advice about assessments and any variations to the Learning Guide
that might be needed.
Delivery
The primary mode of delivery for this unit is facetoface
lectures and tutorials.
However, these will be supplemented by some (equivalent to approximately 25%)
online lectures, tutorial discussions and learning activities, as well as fieldtrips
to
relevant sites in Sydney. Please see the unit schedule above for more details.
Attendance
Students are expected to attend all facetoface
lectures and tutorials and to
participate actively in all class activities (whether online or facetoface).
Failure to
do so may seriously undermine your ability to complete the unit satisfactorily.
Attendance records may be consulted in the assessment of any requests for
extensions or Special Consideration. You should advise the Unit Coordinator if you
are unable to attend a tutorial due to illness or misadventure.
This unit is worth 10 credit points, indicating that success in the unit requires at
least 10 hours work per week. Three hours will be lecture/tutorial time and the
remaining 7 hours should be devoted to reading and study, assessment
preparation, and revision. In this unit you will need to devote much of this time to
completing the set readings.
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 3 of 16
Textbook
No essential texts as students will be provided with the weekly reading materials
on vUWS.
Readings
WEEKLY READINGS
Week 1 No
Readings
Week 2
Loomba, A 2002, ‘Situating colonial and postcolonial studies’, in
Colonialism/postcolonialism, Routledge, New York, NY, pp. 119.
Said, EW 2006, ‘Orientalism’, in BG Ashcroft, G Tiffin & H Pages (eds), The postcolonial
studies reader, 2nd edn, Routledge, London, UK, pp. 2427.
Week 3
Glauser, B 2011, ‘Being indigenous: the concept of indigeneity, a conversation
with two Ayoreo leaders’, in S Venkateswar & E Hughes (eds), Politics of
indigeneity: dialogues and reflections on Indigenous activism, Zed Books, London,
UK, pp. 2144.
MoretonRobinson,
A 2004, ‘Whiteness, epistemology and Indigenous
representation’, in Whitening race: essays in social and cultural criticism,
Aboriginal Studies Press, Canberra, pp. 7588.
Week 4
Lucero, N 2013, ‘Being Indian in the city’: generational differences in the
negotiation of native identity among urbanbased
American Indians, in E Peters &
C Andersen (eds), Indigenous in the city: contemporary identities and cultural
innovation, UBC Press, Vancouver, pp. 193215.
Paradies, YC 2006, ‘Beyond black and white: essentialism, hybridity and
Indigeneity’, Journal of Sociology, vol. 42, no. 4, pp. 35567.
Week 5 No
Readings
Week 6
Hendry, J 2005, ‘Arts, architecture, and native creativity’, in Reclaiming culture:
Indigenous people and self representation, Palgrave Macmillan, Gordonsville, VA,
pp. 13155.
Meekison, L 2000, ‘Indigenous presence in the Sydney games’, in G Ward & C
Smith, Indigenous cultures in an interconnected world, Allen & Unwin, St
Leonards, NSW, pp. 10926.
Week 7
Hall, M 2007, ‘Politics, power and Indigenous tourism’, in R Butler & T Hinch (eds),
Tourism and Indigenous peoples: issues and Implications, ButterworthHeinemann,
Oxford, pp. 30518.
Holman, C 2011, ‘Surfing for a Shaman: analyzing an Ayahuasca website’, Annals
of Tourism Research, vol. 38, no. 1, pp. 90109.
Week 8 No
Readings
Week 9 No
Readings
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 4 of 16
Week 10
Scherl, LM & Edwards, S 2007, ‘Tourism, Indigenous and local communities and
protected areas in developing nations’, in R Bushell & P Eagles (eds), Tourism and
protected areas: benefits beyond boundaries: The Vth IUCN World Parks
Congress, CABI, Cambridge, MA, pp. 7188.
Gulson, KN & Parkes, RJ 2010, ‘From the barrel of the gun: policy incursions, land,
and Aboriginal peoples in Australia’, Environment and Planning A, vol. 42, no. 2,
pp. 30013.
Week 11 No
Readings
Week 12
Goodwin, H 2007, ‘Indigenous tourism and poverty reduction’, in R Butler & T
Hinch (eds), Tourism and Indigenous peoples: issues and implications, Butterworth
Heinemann,
Oxford, pp. 8494.
Radcliffe, SA, Laurie, N & Andolina, R 2009, ‘Development, transnational networks,
and Indigenous politics’, in Indigenous development in the Andes: culture, power,
and transnationalism, Duke University Press, Durham, NC, pp. 3652.
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 5 of 16
Knowledge: Museums and Indigenous Perspectives. Lincoln, NE, USA: University of
Nebraska Press
Nakata,M. (2007) Disciplining the Savages, Savaging the Disciplines. Canberra,
Australia: Aboriginal Studies Press. Teverson, A., Upstone, S. & Palgrave Connect
(Online Service) (2011), Postcolonial spaces: the politics of place in contemporary
culture. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
Schwarz, H. and Ray, S. (eds.) (2004). A Companion to Postcolonial Studies.
Cambridge: Blackwell. Venkateswar, S. and Hughes, E. (eds) (2011) Politics of
Indigeneity: Dialogues and Reflections on Indigenous
Activism. London, UK: Zed Books
Ward, G, & Smith, C (2000) Indigenous Cultures In An Interconnected World, Allen
& Unwin.
Wilson, P. and Stewart, M. (eds) (2008) Global indigenous media: cultures,
poetics, and politics. Durham: Duke
University Press.
Referencing
The referencing requirement for units in Social Science is the Harvard style. Full
details on the Harvard style of referencing can be found at:
http://library.uws.edu.au/FILES/cite_Harvard.pdf
Other Resources
Additional Readings
Aicken, M. & Ryan, C. (2005). Indigenous Tourism: the commodification and
management of culture. Oxford, UK & Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Taylor &
Francis.
Arthur, B. & Morphy, F. (eds.) (2005) Macquarie Atlas of Indigenous Australia:
Culture and Society through Space and Time, Macquarie Library, NSW.
Bushell, R. and Eagles, P.F.J. (eds)(2007) Tourism and Protected Areas: Benefits
Beyond Boundaries. Wallingford, Oxon, UK: CABI Publishing.
Butler, R. and Hinch, T. (eds)(2012) Tourism and Indigenous Peoples: issues and
implications. Oxford, UK and
Burlington, MA, USA: Taylor & Francis,
Comaroff, J.L. and Comaroff, J. (2009) Ethnicity, Inc. Chicago, USA: University of
Chicago Press.
de la Cadena, M. and Starn, O.(eds) (2007) Indigenous Experience Today. Oxford,
UK: Berg Publishers
Engle, K. (2010) The elusive promise of indigenous development: rights, culture,
strategy. Durham: Duke University
Press.
Eversole, R. H., McNeish, J. and Cimadamore, A. D (eds) (2005) Indigenous peoples
and poverty: an international perspective. London, UK: Zed Books.
Hendry, J. (2010) Reclaiming culture: indigenous people and self representation.
Palgrave Macmillan, New York. SleeperSmith,
S. (ed) (2009) Contesting
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 6 of 16
SECTION TWO: Assessment Information
Course Outcomes Click on this link to see the courselevel
learning outcomes (or graduate attributes)
you need to have attained when you graduate: http://tinyurl.com/ssapclo
Unit Outcomes
After successful completion of this Unit, students will be able to:
1. Explain how globalisation has complexified indigenous cultural identities
2. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the historical and contemporary
relationships between indigenous and nonindigenous
peoples and
cultures by discussing the theories and concepts of colonialism,
postcolonialism, autonomy and selfdetermination
3. Critically reflect on the issues of cultural representation and cultural
consumption
4. Conduct a case study to analyse how politics, power, ethics, ontology and
epistemology influence the treatment of indigenous peoples in one of the
following contexts: tourism and heritage, the cultural industries, land
management and the natural environment, development
Unit to Course This unit and its unit outcomes relate to the learning outcomes of the course as
shown in the relevant Table of the Course Outcomes link above.
Assessment Assessment Overview:
Assessment Worth Length Outcomes Threshold
1 Essay 40% 1,500 words 1, 2, 3 No
2 Group
presentation
20% 5 minutes per group
member
4 No
3 Reflective journal 40% 1,500 words 14
No
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 7 of 16
ASSESSMENT ONE
A1 Assessment Essay (1,500 words) Worth: 40%
A1 Due BEFORE Friday 11 September, 2015, 5:00 PM
A1 Submission
Assessment format:
Essay
Length/Duration:
1,500 words
Due date and time:
BY 5PM
Friday, 11th September 2015
Late penalty:
If the assignment is submitted (without an approved extension) after the due date and time, it will
attract a late penalty of 10% per day (including weekends) up to a maximum of 10 days, at which
time the penalty will be 100% of what the assignment is worth.
Assessments will not be accepted after the marked assessment task has been returned to students
who submitted the task on time.
Also see section on Extension, Special Consideration, and late assignment penalties in attached Social
Science Student Resources document.
Submission method:
Essays are to be submitted via Turnitin. NO HARDCOPY REQUIRED.
Is assessment compulsory?
Yes, you must complete this assessment in order to be eligible to pass the unit (as explained in
Section 5) regardless of the aggregate mark you achieve across assessments.
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 8 of 16
A1 Description
Students are to choose ONE of the following essay topics/questions to write their essay on:
1. What is the difference between colonialism and postcolonialism?
Why is the notion of
postcolonialism
so heavily contested in countries like Australia?
2. Why have concepts of autonomy and selfdetermination
played such a large part in the
contemporary Indigenous rights movement? How is this related to the history of colonialism
and how does it play out with respect to indigenous and nonindigenous
relationships today?
(Students can address this question with a global focus or choose to adopt a single country
case study).
3. One of the difficulties of Indigenous tourism is that it often relies upon cultural
commodification. Why is this problematic and how can this tension be resolved?
4. In what ways are contemporary Indigenous identities and cultures challenged by
globalisation? Discuss with reference to the films Whale Rider and Samson & Delilah.
5. Why are issues of representation and consumption, autonomy and selfdetermination
so
important when it comes to managing Indigenous cultural heritage?
Guidelines to help in preparing your essay
Students are encouraged to:
1. Start your research early on by referring to the set readings and additional resources listed
in the course outline.
Keep in mind though that it is not compulsory for students to utilise these resources. In fact,
students are expected to undertake some amount of independent research. Thus, you may like to
seek additional materials as follows:
a. Academic: Library books and journals can be accessed using the library databases.
b. Institutional: Organisational websites (e.g. The Australian Bureau of Statistics,
Tourism Australia, United Nations, World Tourism Organisation) may provide useful
information. Keep in mind though that blogs, social networking sites, Wikipedia etc.
are not considered to be academic sources. In many cases the information on these
sites has not been subject to peer evaluation and/or the accuracy of the material
presented therein cannot be verified. For this reason, internet sources in particular
should be carefully evaluated.
c. Media: Various media (e.g. travel brochures, tourism websites, magazines,
newspapers, television media, and films) can be used as empirical examples.
However, these should be used sparingly to help illustrate your points in original,
creative and reflective ways. As with academic and institutional sources these must be
appropriately referenced.
2. As you read be sure to take comprehensive notes which will help you make sense of the
topic. When you take notes remember to identify someone else’s ideas or thoughts with
accurate referencing so as to avoid plagiarism when it comes time to writing up.
3. Everyone has a different approach to essay writing but you need to ensure that you
undertake some level of planning. Noting key points and the order in which you will address
them will help you develop a logical argument. If you keep referring back to them as you
write, your list of key points can also help you ensure that you are being consistent and not
wavering from your argument.
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 9 of 16
a. ‘Does this point relate to the main ideas I want to get across or does it distract the
reader’?
b. ‘Does the point I am making answer the question? Does it relate to the point before
and after it, and if so how?’
c. ‘So what? What is the significance of this point? Why am I writing about it?’
d. ‘How can I prove my point?’ ‘What sources can I use to support my argument?’
e. ‘Do I agree with the perspective presented in the source that I am discussing?
Why/why not?’ ‘How does the perspective of the author that I am discussing
compare/contrast with some of the others?’ ‘What is unique/interesting about what
this author has to say?’
5. Leave plenty of time to allow for editing your work. Ideally this should include running a
spelling and grammar check, reading the essay in full and having somebody else read your
work. It is amazing what a fresh pair of eyes can pick up!
A1 Criteria
Assessment 1 is designed to measure the extent to which students have met the following learning
outcomes:
1. Explain how globalisation has complexified indigenous cultural identities.
2. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the historical and contemporary relationships
between indigenous and nonindigenous
peoples and cultures by discussing the theories and
concepts of colonialism, postcolonialism,
autonomy and selfdetermination.
3. Critically reflect on the issues of cultural representation and cultural consumption.
In addition, as the task involves students developing highlevel
academic research and writing skills,
it will also be assessed on the basis of the following criteria:
1. Research (students should endeavour to incorporate at least 5 ACADEMIC sources into
their essays, 2 of which should go beyond the set readings).
2. Written expression and structure (students should develop their essays in conjunction with
appropriate academic protocols)
3. Referencing (students should follow the Academic Guide to Writing provided on the vUWS
site and ensure that they submit assessment items which are in keeping with the UWS Policy
on Academic Misconduct)
As detailed in the attached marking sheet, the essay will be graded according to these learning
outcomes and guidelines.
4. Begin writing your essay! As you do so, keep in mind that better essays are those that
develop a strong line of argument, which is well structured and balances description and
critical analysis. Good questions to ask yourself are:
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 10 of 16
ASSESSMENT TWO
A2 Assessment Group Work IN CLASS – PRESENTATIONS Worth: 20%
A2 Due BEFORE Thursday 16 October, 2015, 12:00 AM
A2 Submission
Assessment format:
Group Work
Length/Duration:
Presentation
Due date and time:
IN CLASS – PRESENTATIONS COMMENCE WEEK 13
Friday, 16th October 2015
Late penalty:
As this assessment is based on an inclass
presentation it will be extremely difficult for students to
submit late. If for any reason you cannot attend your group’s presentation you must ensure you
contact the unit coordinator as a matter of
urgency.
If the assignment is submitted (without an approved extension) after the due
date and time, it will attract a late penalty of 10% per day (including weekends) up to a maximum of
10 days, at which time the penalty will be 100% of what the assignment is worth.
Assessments will not be accepted after the marked assessment task has been returned to students
who submitted the task on time.
Also see section on Extension, Special Consideration, and late assignment penalties
in attached Social Science Student Resources document .
Submission method:
InClass.
Is assessment compulsory?
Yes, you must complete this assessment in order to be eligible to pass the unit (as explained in
Section 5) regardless of the aggregate mark you achieve across assessments
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 11 of 16
A2 Description
Group presentations examining the experiences of indigenous peoples and cultures in the contexts
of:
• Tourism and Heritage;
• OR the Cultural Industries;
• OR Urban Planning and/or Land Management;
• OR the Natural Environment;
• OR Development
are to be delivered in weeks 13 & 14 (during the lecture and tutorial timeslots). In week 2 of the
semester, students will be organised into groups and assigned a timeslot in which to deliver their
presentation.
Each group presentation should be no more than 25 minutes in length (approximately 5 minutes
per group member). The presentations should be based around a case study that each group has
developed with respect to the experiences of a particular Indigenous group (or groups from a specific
country) in one of the contexts above. As well as undertaking library research it is anticipated that AT
LEAST ONE of the self-guided field trips (whether real or virtual) that students undertake will inform
the presentation. In developing their case study students should provide:
1. A brief introduction to their chosen group/s and to the historical and contemporary sociocultural
positioning of their group/s.
2. An overview of the context that they chose to examine (e.g. tourism or heritage, development, the
cultural industries) and the parameters they set around that (e.g. rather than focusing on the cultural
industries at large students might focus on music; or in examining development they might look at
health or human rights etc.).
3. A brief explanation of what research they undertook – in particular how their field trips informed
their research
and subsequent presentation.
4. Presentation and analysis of the findings of the case study.
With respect to the last point students should give some consideration (as relevant) to the following
issues/concepts:
• Politics and power dynamics
• Inequality
• Ethics and rights frameworks
• Colonial and postcolonial histories
• Conflicts/tensions around ontology and epistemology
• Autonomy and selfdetermination
• Representation and/or consumption of indigenous cultures
Students DO NOT have to consider all of these issues and the more contained a presentation is the
more likely it is to be manageable and cohesive. So be selective and think carefully about which
groups you want to focus on and what in particular you want to find out about their experience(s).
For instance, students might opt to examine the way in which issues of representation and
consumption with respect to Maori art (as an example of the cultural industries) relate to Maori
peoples experiences of colonialism. On the other hand, students might want to focus on land
management in Australia and how conflicts around that have resulted from differing ontologies and
epistemologies, particularly with r espect to nature. These are just examples and students are
encouraged to develop their case study in consultation with the unit coordinator. Time will be set
aside for this in the lead up to the first fieldtrip
in week 8.
It is up to each group to decide how they will structure their presentation, but in so doing please
consider the specified time frames, as well as the learning outcomes, assignment guidelines and
marking criteria specified below.
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 12 of 16
A2 Criteria
Assessment 2 is designed to measure the extent to which students have met learning outcome
number 4, which is to:
Analyse through a case study how politics, power, ethics, ontology and epistemology
influence the treatment of indigenous peoples in one of the following contexts: tourism and
heritage, the cultural industries, land management and the natural environment,
development.
In addition, as the task requires highlevel
academic research skills and is designed to assist students
develop skills in oral presentation, it will also be assessed on the basis of the following criteria:
1. The quality of academic research (students should draw on at least 34
of the set readings
in developing their group presentations).
2. The quality of empirical research (students should provide a clear overview of the
parameters of their case study, a clear rationale for their choice and an explanation as to
how/where the empirical research was carried out).
3. Structure and clarity of the presentation (the presentations should be well structured and
cohesive, there should be evidence of forward planning, students should manage their time
effectively and speak clearly).
4. Originality and creativity (part of delivering an oral presentation is about considering how
to effectively communicate information to one’s audience. While the emphasis is on
substance, students should endeavour to create engaging group presentations).
Please see the attached marking sheet for more information.
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 13 of 16
ASSESSMENT THREE
A3 Assessment Reflective Journal (1,500 words) Worth: 40%
A3 Due BEFORE Friday 23 October, 2015, 5:00 PM
A3 Submission
Assessment format:
Reflective Journal
Length/Duration:
1500 words
Due date and time:
Weekly entries required.
Final reflections due no later than 5PM
Friday 23rdth October 2015
Late penalty:
If the assignment is submitted (without an approved extension) after the due
date and time, it will attract a late penalty of 10% per day (including weekends) up to a maximum of
10 days, at which time the penalty will be 100% of what the assignment is worth.
Assessments will not be accepted after the marked assessment task has been returned to students
who submitted the task on time.
Also see section on Extension, Special Consideration, and late assignment penalties
in attached Social Science Student Resources document..
Submission method:
Online submission (weekly journal entries). Final reflections to be submitted via
Turnitin. NO HARDCOPY REQUIRED.
Is assessment compulsory?
Yes, you must complete this assessment in order to be eligible to pass the unit (as explained in
Section 5) regardless of the aggregate mark you achieve across assessments
Is Cover Sheet required?
No, not required
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 14 of 16
A3 Description
This assessment is split into two parts.
Part one:
As part of the assessment for this unit students will be required to keep a reflective journal. Journal
entries (based on the readings, lecture content and students’ field trip observations) should be made
weekly. The weekly journal entries should be no more than 300 words in length, and should
summarise and critically reflect on key concepts/theories and/or issues/topics covered in the unit.
While the journal is private (only accessible to the student and the unit coordinator) it should be
scholarly in nature (so written in an academic style and with appropriate referencing).
Students will get 2 marks for each week that they submit a quality journal entry on time (up to a
maximum of 20 marks).
The journals will be opened to students in vUWS during week 1 (to enable students to make an entry
on the week 2 readings) and will close by the end of week 12. This enables students to make entries
as follows:
Weeks 27:
entries are to be made on the set readings BEFORE your assigned tutorials (Tuesday for
Bankstown students, Thursday for Penrith students). You may also opt to reflect on the lecture
content from the week prior if you so wish. Week 8: As there are no readings this week, entries
should be based on your first set of fieldtrip
observations. As students may undertake their field
trips at different times, entries are to be made by the end of week 8.
Week 9: INTRA SEMESTER BREAK – NO ENTRIES REQUIRED.
Week 10: Entries on the week 10 set readings are to be made prior to tutorials.
Week 11: As there are no readings this week, entries should be based on your second set of fieldtrip
observations. As students may undertake their field trips at different times, entries are to be made
by the end of week 11.
Week 12: Entries on the week 12 set readings are to be made PRIOR to tutorials.
Part Two:
At the end of the semester students will then be requested to submit a 1500 word compilation of
their reflections. Students might opt to present a few of what they consider to be their best entries
(prefaced with an introduction and conclusion), or they might opt to condense their entries into a
1500 word paper providing an overall critical reflection on their learning in the unit. More
instructions will be given on this final component of the assessment in tutorials.
A3 Criteria
Part one of the task is marked on the basis of participation alone (i.e. each time students submit a
quality weekly journal entry on time they will get 2 marks. Students will not get more than 2 marks
per week).
Part two will be assessed according to the extent to which the student has demonstrated they have
met the following learning outcomes:
1. Explain how globalisation has complexified indigenous cultural identities.
2. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the historical and contemporary relationships
between indigenous and nonindigenous
peoples and cultures by discussing the theories and
concepts of colonialism, postcolonialism,
autonomy and selfdetermination.
3. Critically reflect on the issues of cultural representation and cultural consumption.
4. Analyse through a case study how politics, power, ethics, ontology and epistemology
influence the treatment of indigenous peoples in one of the following contexts: tourism and
heritage, the cultural industries, land management and the natural environment,
development.
In addition, students will also be assessed on the basis of their writing, levels of critical analysis and
referencing. Please see the attached marking sheet for more information.
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 15 of 16
Section 3 SECTION THREE: Teaching and Learning Activities
For your convenience the Learning and Teaching Schedule is on the second page of the Learning
Guide.
Section 4 SECTION FOUR: Learning Resources
For your convenience the following are listed in Section 1 with other Unit Information:
• Textbook
• Readings
• Any additional resources
• Referencing requirements.
Literacy
Relevance of Unit to Courses of Study
This unit is a compulsory unit in the Geography & Urban Studies and the Tourism & Heritage studies
majors and an elective in the Sociology & Peace and Development studies majors in the Bachelor of
Social Science. It can be taken as a free elective by other students who have previously undertaken
some social science study.
About the Experiential Group Component of this Unit
Group work and other blended learning activities form a crucial component of this unit. It is
important that students contribute to ALL learning activities and take an engaged approach to their
studies. Blended learning and activities like selfguided
field trips have the benefit of flexibility and
allow students to balance study with other commitments. They also allow students to learn in a
variety of ways and to pursue interests relevant to their individual majors and/or career paths.
However, they also place significant responsibilities on the student for managing their time
effectively. Students will be given plenty of instruction in completing all of the group work, blended
learning exercises and assessments in this unit but should contact the unit coordinator if they have
any queries or concerns about some of these newer methods of learning and assessment.
Section 5 SECTION FIVE: Expectations of You, and By You
See SSAPguide for:
• Expectations of students
• Expectations of UWS staff
• Raising concerns
• Links to key policies.
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 16 of 16