Biblical Roots of CST and Catholic Moral Theology

Biblical Roots of CST and Catholic Moral Theology

LESSON 1
Introduction, Course Overview, and Unit Overview
LEARNING OUTCOMES In this lesson, you will do the following: 1. List and describe the seven themes of Catholic social teaching
READINGS
? Seven Themes of CST:
http://www.usccb.org/beliefs-and-teachings/what-we-believe/catholic-social-teaching/seven-themes-of-catholic-social-teaching.cfm
? PowerPoint Presentation for Unit 1
ACTIVITIES / ASSESSMENTS
1. Activity 1: Review the Course Syllabus
Examine the course as a whole. Gain an understanding of the course’s direction and purpose, the reading assignments, and the written assignments.
2. Activity 2: Keep a Journal/Notebook Alongside the Presentations/Lecture Notes
As you read, keep notes of the readings (record references). Note different issues, your interests, personal reactions, and pastoral experience to each reference. You can do this independently of, or in conjunction with, the presentations (lecture notes) for each unit. Strive for consistency. You will not have to submit these notes, but this activity will be valuable. As you progress through the course, the journal and your notes will help keep you organized for your written assignments, including the final research paper.
3. Activity 3: Engage the Catholic Social Tradition
Read through and familiarize yourself with the seven themes of Catholic social thought as presented by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (www.usccb.org). Use the discussion board to do the following:
? Address the significance of the seven themes of Catholic social thought and the importance placed on each theme.
? Decide which themes seem most important and which themes might be overlooked frequently.
? Describe the relationship between “life and dignity of the human person” and “solidarity.”
? Describe the relationship between these two themes and the others.
PLEASE NOTE: All graded assignments for this Unit should be grouped together and submitted using the Assignment Submission form accessed from your course homepage or http://www.sjcme.edu/gps/assignments.

LESSON 2
The Biblical Roots of CST and Catholic Moral Theology
LEARNING OUTCOMES In this lesson, you will do the following: 1. Summarize the biblical roots for the seven CST theses. 2. Compare the “historicist” and “classical” mindsets in Catholic theology. 3. Develop an understanding of the historical emergence of moral theology.
READINGS
? Benestad Text: Introduction and Chapter 1
? McCarthy Text: “Biblical Justice” by M. Birge, pp. 19-30
? Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church: Part I, Chapters 1-4
? Keenan Text: Chapters 1-5
? PowerPoint Presentation for Unit 1
ACTIVITIES / ASSESSMENTS
1. Assigned Readings: Continue with the remainder of Unit 1’s assigned readings. Use the lecture notes for clarification. Coordinate your note-taking—including your experiences of the materials that seem most provocative (or perplexing!)—with the lecture notes.
2. Paper Assignment:
Submit a 5- to 7-page paper discussing the theological shift from a “classicist” to a “historicist” mindset as described by Bernard Lonergan. In your paper, address the following:
? Describe what Lonergan meant by “classicist” and “historicist.”
? Decide if these categories are mutually exclusive
? Decide where, in your opinion, Lonergan would place biblical scholarship like that described by Birge?
? Choose where these perspectives surface in twentieth-century Roman Catholic moral theology.
? Decide the influence (if at all) of “evolutionary” rhetoric in this discussion. Is it possible (and permissible) to “revert” back to a classicist view?
PLEASE NOTE: All graded assignments for this Unit should be grouped together and submitted using the Assignment Submission form accessed from your course homepage or http://www.sjcme.edu/gps/assignments.