comparing and contrast two poems

comparing and contrast two poems

Comparison and/or Contrast of Two Poems Considering the poems listed below, find a common theme or foundation, such as decision-making, finding identity or place in world, aging, and so on. You may use one of these or find your own. Select the two poems that best illustrate this common foundation. Your purpose is to compare (How are the two poems similar) and/or contrast (how are the two poems different) in relation to this common theme. Brainstorm to find three points of similarity and/or difference. Create a blueprint thesis sentence that names the two subjects and lists the three points, indicating whether each point is a similarity or difference. Poems from which to select: “Cross” by Langston Hughes, 749-750 “Ulysses” by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, 811-813,912,930-933,945,946 “A Noiseless Patient Spider” by Walt Whitman, 6, 794-795,796,797 “Much Madness is divinest Sense” by Emily Dickinson, 815-816 “I heard a Fly buzz—when I died” by Emily Dickinson, 933-935 “Richard Cory” by Edwin Arlington Robinson, 721-722 “The Road not Taken” by Robert Frost, 792-794,799, 816 “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” by T.S. Eliot, 990-995 Terms to Make Use of in Analysis Speaker Imagery Symbol Metaphor Simile personification Requirements Content Introduction with hook that includes titles and authors, any needed background information, transition into thesis and blueprint thesis as specified above and in lesson, and is five sentences or more. Three body paragraphs, each body paragraph with a topic sentence that summarizes two subjects on one of the blueprint points, discusses each subject on that point and provides at least one piece of cited evidence for each subject, and is eight to twelve sentences or more. Concluding paragraph that is five or more sentences, restates blueprint thesis, may summarize points, and provides clincher (which can be a practical application of how the common theme provides knowledge that can be applied in everyday life). Style Formal (no contractions, informal words, slang, first or second person) Consistent use of historical present tense in discussing the literary works MLA MLA format (double spaced with title centered and properly capitalized) MLA documentation: Poetry cited by line Slash used between lines, if quotation is no longer than three lines Indented format if quotation is over three lines Capital maintained at beginning of each line Works cited (two to three alphabetized, properly indented entries)