Creating Effective Classroom and Learning Environment

 

Building an Effective Classroom Learning Environment: Modules 2 – 4 Assignment Walden University EDUC 6604: Creating an Effective Classroom Environment Date in this format: June 5, 2018 Fostering Postive Relationships (Module 2) Introduction It is essential that teachers build relationships with both their students and students’ parents. Having effective communication for school-family partnerships lead to the student having improved behavior and also help achieve academic success. Jones and Jones (2015) report that teachers who start a significant relationship with both their students and students’ family may lead to the student having a successful school year. “Consistent with this prediction, in studies involving child-adult interaction, adult provision of autonomy support has resulted in better relationship quality, measured as rapport” (Gurland and Evangelista, 2015, p. 881). Educators need to have a close relationship with their students to cultivate a positive, supportive learning environment where the child is comfortable to learn. Having a positive rapport with students’ parents is just as important. “Cooperation between teachers and parents leads to the development of a shared responsibility that will contribute to the attainment of educational goals, in particular, when unique children are concerned, who bring to the field of learning and life itself attention and concentration difficulties and learning disabilities that impede their learning process and their integration into the education system in general” (Raviv, 2016, p. 37). Building these relationships allow for the teacher to openly discuss the student’s abilities with the parents in a more trusted and valued relationship. Parent Newsletter Article In this section, insert the content of your Parent Newsletter article. The first article is for the parent newsletter that is sent to all families. Write a 1- to 2-page article on creating positive relationships between school staff and families. In your article, include the following: • Why home and school relationships are important. Provide a rationale citing specific references to the Learning Resources and outside resources you researched. • Strategies for creating positive relationships between home and school. • Ideas for using technology to increase interactions between home and school. Staff Newsletter Article In this section, insert the content of your Parent Newsletter article. Scenario 2: The second article is for the staff-only newsletter that is sent to all staff at the school. Write a 1- to 2-page article on creating positive school professional to student relationships. Keep in mind that all school professional to student relationships are important, including the secretary, the lunchroom aide, the custodian, etc. In your article, include the following: • Why school staff and student relationships are important. Provide a rationale citing specific references to the Learning Resources and outside resources you researched. • Strategies for creating positive relationships between school staff and students • Provide ideas for building relationships with students from diverse backgrounds. Increasing Engagement Through Feedback and Planned Transitions (Module 3) Transitions and Feedback In this section, provide your assessment on your classroom transitions and feedback as instructed in the Module 3 Assignment. • Assess the strategies you use or have used to provide feedback in your classroom. Explain whether the strategies you use or have used work and why. Then, explain how you implement feedback to meet the diverse needs of your students in your specialization area. • Assess the way you handle transitions in your classroom. Explain whether the strategies you use or have used work and why. Then, explain how you design transition activities to meet the diverse needs of your students in your specialization area. • Explain how you intend to continue to work on providing effective feedback and transition strategies that are specific to your specialization. Support your response with specific references to outside resources and the Learning Resources. • Create a resource list containing effective feedback strategies (1 page) and a list of transition activities (1 page). List at least 5 strategies for feedback and 5 strategies for transitions. Insert your Resource Pages as Appendices A and B. For this Assignment and all scholarly writing in this course and throughout your program, you will be required to use APA style. Please use the Walden Writing Center as a resource as you complete assignments. Please be sure to refer also to the MSED Assignment/Reflective Essay Rubric located in the MSED Documents area under Course Home. Problem Solving Methods (Module 4) Introduction In this section, provide a brief overview of the student you selected for this activity and explain the specific problem you addressed with the problem soving method. Problem Solving Methods Explanation In this section, provide a response to the prompts as instructed in the Module 4 Assignment. When problem-solving methods are implemented effectively, the socio-emotional needs of students are met, behaviors are changed, and more learning can occur. For the Module 4 Assignment, you will implement the seven-step problem solving method from the Jones and Jones (2015) text with one of your students. You will also create a graphic organizer as a resource to share with your colleagues, to implement in your school setting, and perhaps, to add to your Professional Toolkit. Throughout Modules 2–4 you will develop a comprehensive assignment combining the information, resources, and reflections on the content of each module. To complete these assignments, use the Building an Effective Classroom Learning Environment: Modules 2–4 Assignment Template located in the Module 2 Learning Resources. As you work on this module’s Assignment, consider the insights you gained from the Module 2 and Module 3 activities and apply them to your work this module. To prepare: • Read Chapter 9 in the course text. • Review the seven-step Problem Solving Method as outlined in Figure 9.2 of the course text. • Select a student that you work with that demonstrates behaviors that you consider disruptive or problematic in your class. Then, implement the method with your selected student. • Reflect on the outcome of the problem-solving activity and how you will handle behavior issues in the future By Day 7 of Week 5 Add the following to your Building an Effective Classroom Learning Environment: Modules 2–4 Assignment Template: Compose a 3- to 4-page section in which you: • Provide a brief overview of the student and explain the specific problem you addressed with the problem-solving method. Note: Do not include any specific identifying information regarding your student (e.g., name, school, etc.). • Explain the specifics of the seven-step problem-solving method you used with your student. Discuss whether the method was effective and what you would change next time a problem arises. • Explain your expected outcomes. Did you meet the expected outcomes? Why or why not? • Explain how you would change or modify the method to interact more effectively with your student. Support your response with specific references to the Learning Resources and outside resources. • Create a graphic organizer of the problem solving steps you chose to implement which will be a resource in your own classroom and could serve as a resource for your school setting colleagues. Insert your Resource Pages as Appendix C. References Fisher, D. (2004). Setting the “opportunity to read” standard: Resuscitating the SSR program in an urban high school. Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, 48, 138-150. doi:10.1598/JAAL.48.2.5 When a DOI is available for documents you retrieve from a library database, such as EBSCOHost or ProQuest, use the DOI. Often, the DOI is printed directly on the first page of the article. Never use the URL from the library database because it is a password-protected site. Frey, N., & Allen, A. (2008). Retelling informational text to improve reports of information. The California Reader, 41(2), 12-15. Retrieved from https://www.californiareads.org/california_reader.htm When no DOI is available, use the home page of the journal and “retrieved from” even though you obtained the article from a database (e.g., ProQuest) or other electronic source. You may need to use a search engine (e.g., Google or Yahoo) to find the homepage. If you used a copy on paper, there is no need to include a DOI or journal homepage. Gardner, H. (1999). Intelligence reframed: Multiple intelligences for the 21st century. New York, NY: Basic Books. Gardner, H. (2004). The unschooled mind: How children think and how schools should teach. New York, NY: Basic Books. Knowles, M. (1998). The adult learner. Woburn, MA: Butterworth-Heinemann. Swan, D. (2006, September 22). Learning styles. Message posted to EDUC 6610 discussion board, Week 3. Appendix: Guidelines for Formatting Video Webcasts in MSED Courses Walden’s guidelines for citing videos can be found here: https://writingcenter.waldenu.edu/624.htm. See below for information that will help you apply those guidelines in MSED. 1. Across the courses in MSED, the in-text citation is (Laureate Education, date) Note: The publishing date for video webcasts is found in the Course Syllabus under Course Materials. This is the date you will use in the in-text citation and in the reference entry. 2. If you are using the DVDs, the correct formatting is: Laureate Education. (Producer). (2010). The power of you [DVD]. In Teacher as professional. Baltimore, MD: Author. Note: Use the actual word Author; do not substitute the author’s name. Also, the title of the course/series is in italics but the individual program is not. 3. How do you tell if the video webcast is in a series or a single video webcast? Videos that are part of a series will usually be listed as Part 1, Part 2, or Program 1, Program 2, etc. Some webcasts are clearly labeled as being excerpts from the Canter videos. 4. If you are viewing the video webcasts in the Resource section of 6610, the correct reference entry is: Laureate Education. (Producer). (year). Name of program [Video file]. Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu Note: Use the above for stand-alone videos that are (a), not part of a series and (b), are viewed via a webcast rather than with an actual DVD. The title of the video webcast is in italics. In the case of a video that is part of a series, the individual program is not in italics, but the series title is italicized instead. Note: Some of your Course Reading guides (click here to find the guide for your course) contain a page called “Writing Tutor” that offers helpful and current advice on handling the citations and other writing requirements of this course. Refer to it frequently as you approach each new week. (These are in process; check for availability.) Updated June 2016. Appendices Appendix A: Effective Feedback Strategies Insert your resource list on effective feedback strategies here. Appendix B: List of Transition Activities Insert your resource list on transition activities here. Appendix C: Problem Solving Steps Graphic Organizer Insert the graphic organizer showing the steps you used with your student here. Building an Effective Classroom Learning Environment: Modules 2 – 4 Assignment Lauren LaGreca Walden University Dr. Kristen Childers EDUC 6604: Creating an Effective Classroom Environment Date in this format: June 5, 2018 Fostering Postive Relationships (Module 2) Introduction It is essential that teachers build relationships with both their students and students’ parents. Having effective communication for school-family partnerships lead to the student having improved behavior and also help achieve academic success. Jones and Jones (2015) report that teachers who start a significant relationship with both their students and students’ family may lead to the student having a successful school year. “Consistent with this prediction, in studies involving child-adult interaction, adult provision of autonomy support has resulted in better relationship quality, measured as rapport” (Gurland and Evangelista, 2015, p. 881). Educators need to have a close relationship with their students to cultivate a positive, supportive learning environment where the child is comfortable to learn. Having a positive rapport with students’ parents is just as important. “Cooperation between teachers and parents leads to the development of a shared responsibility that will contribute to the attainment of educational goals, in particular, when unique children are concerned, who bring to the field of learning and life itself attention and concentration difficulties and learning disabilities that impede their learning process and their integration into the education system in general” (Raviv, 2016, p. 37). Building these relationships allow for the teacher to openly discuss the student’s abilities with the parents in a more trusted and valued relationship. Parent Newsletter Article In this section, insert the content of your Parent Newsletter article. The first article is for the parent newsletter that is sent to all families. Write a 1- to 2-page article on creating positive relationships between school staff and families. In your article, include the following: • Why home and school relationships are important. Provide a rationale citing specific references to the Learning Resources and outside resources you researched. • Strategies for creating positive relationships between home and school. • Ideas for using technology to increase interactions between home and school. Staff Newsletter Article In this section, insert the content of your Parent Newsletter article. Scenario 2: The second article is for the staff-only newsletter that is sent to all staff at the school. Write a 1- to 2-page article on creating positive school professional to student relationships. Keep in mind that all school professional to student relationships are important, including the secretary, the lunchroom aide, the custodian, etc. In your article, include the following: • Why school staff and student relationships are important. Provide a rationale citing specific references to the Learning Resources and outside resources you researched. • Strategies for creating positive relationships between school staff and students • Provide ideas for building relationships with students from diverse backgrounds. Increasing Engagement Through Feedback and Planned Transitions (Module 3) Transitions and Feedback In this section, provide your assessment on your classroom transitions and feedback as instructed in the Module 3 Assignment. • Assess the strategies you use or have used to provide feedback in your classroom. Explain whether the strategies you use or have used work and why. Then, explain how you implement feedback to meet the diverse needs of your students in your specialization area. • Assess the way you handle transitions in your classroom. Explain whether the strategies you use or have used work and why. Then, explain how you design transition activities to meet the diverse needs of your students in your specialization area. • Explain how you intend to continue to work on providing effective feedback and transition strategies that are specific to your specialization. Support your response with specific references to outside resources and the Learning Resources. • Create a resource list containing effective feedback strategies (1 page) and a list of transition activities (1 page). List at least 5 strategies for feedback and 5 strategies for transitions. Insert your Resource Pages as Appendices A and B. For this Assignment and all scholarly writing in this course and throughout your program, you will be required to use APA style. Please use the Walden Writing Center as a resource as you complete assignments. Please be sure to refer also to the MSED Assignment/Reflective Essay Rubric located in the MSED Documents area under Course Home. Problem Solving Methods (Module 4) Introduction In this section, provide a brief overview of the student you selected for this activity and explain the specific problem you addressed with the problem soving method. Problem Solving Methods Explanation In this section, provide a response to the prompts as instructed in the Module 4 Assignment. When problem-solving methods are implemented effectively, the socio-emotional needs of students are met, behaviors are changed, and more learning can occur. For the Module 4 Assignment, you will implement the seven-step problem solving method from the Jones and Jones (2015) text with one of your students. You will also create a graphic organizer as a resource to share with your colleagues, to implement in your school setting, and perhaps, to add to your Professional Toolkit. Throughout Modules 2–4 you will develop a comprehensive assignment combining the information, resources, and reflections on the content of each module. To complete these assignments, use the Building an Effective Classroom Learning Environment: Modules 2–4 Assignment Template located in the Module 2 Learning Resources. As you work on this module’s Assignment, consider the insights you gained from the Module 2 and Module 3 activities and apply them to your work this module. To prepare: • Read Chapter 9 in the course text. • Review the seven-step Problem Solving Method as outlined in Figure 9.2 of the course text. • Select a student that you work with that demonstrates behaviors that you consider disruptive or problematic in your class. Then, implement the method with your selected student. • Reflect on the outcome of the problem-solving activity and how you will handle behavior issues in the future By Day 7 of Week 5 Add the following to your Building an Effective Classroom Learning Environment: Modules 2–4 Assignment Template: Compose a 3- to 4-page section in which you: • Provide a brief overview of the student and explain the specific problem you addressed with the problem-solving method. Note: Do not include any specific identifying information regarding your student (e.g., name, school, etc.). • Explain the specifics of the seven-step problem-solving method you used with your student. Discuss whether the method was effective and what you would change next time a problem arises. • Explain your expected outcomes. Did you meet the expected outcomes? Why or why not? • Explain how you would change or modify the method to interact more effectively with your student. Support your response with specific references to the Learning Resources and outside resources. • Create a graphic organizer of the problem solving steps you chose to implement which will be a resource in your own classroom and could serve as a resource for your school setting colleagues. Insert your Resource Pages as Appendix C. References Fisher, D. (2004). Setting the “opportunity to read” standard: Resuscitating the SSR program in an urban high school. Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, 48, 138-150. doi:10.1598/JAAL.48.2.5 When a DOI is available for documents you retrieve from a library database, such as EBSCOHost or ProQuest, use the DOI. Often, the DOI is printed directly on the first page of the article. Never use the URL from the library database because it is a password-protected site. Frey, N., & Allen, A. (2008). Retelling informational text to improve reports of information. The California Reader, 41(2), 12-15. Retrieved from https://www.californiareads.org/california_reader.htm When no DOI is available, use the home page of the journal and “retrieved from” even though you obtained the article from a database (e.g., ProQuest) or other electronic source. You may need to use a search engine (e.g., Google or Yahoo) to find the homepage. If you used a copy on paper, there is no need to include a DOI or journal homepage. Gardner, H. (1999). Intelligence reframed: Multiple intelligences for the 21st century. New York, NY: Basic Books. Gardner, H. (2004). The unschooled mind: How children think and how schools should teach. New York, NY: Basic Books. Knowles, M. (1998). The adult learner. Woburn, MA: Butterworth-Heinemann. Swan, D. (2006, September 22). Learning styles. Message posted to EDUC 6610 discussion board, Week 3. Appendix: Guidelines for Formatting Video Webcasts in MSED Courses Walden’s guidelines for citing videos can be found here: https://writingcenter.waldenu.edu/624.htm. See below for information that will help you apply those guidelines in MSED. 1. Across the courses in MSED, the in-text citation is (Laureate Education, date) Note: The publishing date for video webcasts is found in the Course Syllabus under Course Materials. This is the date you will use in the in-text citation and in the reference entry. 2. If you are using the DVDs, the correct formatting is: Laureate Education. (Producer). (2010). The power of you [DVD]. In Teacher as professional. Baltimore, MD: Author. Note: Use the actual word Author; do not substitute the author’s name. Also, the title of the course/series is in italics but the individual program is not. 3. How do you tell if the video webcast is in a series or a single video webcast? Videos that are part of a series will usually be listed as Part 1, Part 2, or Program 1, Program 2, etc. Some webcasts are clearly labeled as being excerpts from the Canter videos. 4. If you are viewing the video webcasts in the Resource section of 6610, the correct reference entry is: Laureate Education. (Producer). (year). Name of program [Video file]. Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu Note: Use the above for stand-alone videos that are (a), not part of a series and (b), are viewed via a webcast rather than with an actual DVD. The title of the video webcast is in italics. In the case of a video that is part of a series, the individual program is not in italics, but the series title is italicized instead. Note: Some of your Course Reading guides (click here to find the guide for your course) contain a page called “Writing Tutor” that offers helpful and current advice on handling the citations and other writing requirements of this course. Refer to it frequently as you approach each new week. (These are in process; check for availability.) Updated June 2016. Appendices Appendix A: Effective Feedback Strategies Insert your resource list on effective feedback strategies here. Appendix B: List of Transition Activities Insert your resource list on transition activities here. Appendix C: Problem Solving Steps Graphic Organizer Insert the graphic organizer showing the steps you used with your student here.