Critical Read questions listed. Reply showing evidence of critical analysis with questions to. Include enough detail to substantiate your thinking as well as your position on the questions or comments. Included Proper in-text citation.Reply to each separt

Critical Read questions listed. Reply showing evidence of critical analysis with questions to. Include enough detail to substantiate your thinking as well as your position on the questions or comments. Included Proper in-text citation.Reply to each separt

Order Description

In your own words, comment on Keith Miller and Latina Morris “attached reply discussions.” Your response should address the DB questions listed and move the conversation forward. Provide quality of your postings, including mastery of the concept as well as critical thinking. If asked for your opinion, do not simply state that it is a good or bad idea; elaborate on your reasons and argument. Include enough detail to substantiate your thinking as well as your position on the questions or comments. . Reply to each separately. Part I. Question 1. What do you think are the differences between analyzing the instructional needs of a learner in a traditional K–12 school versus analyzing the instructional needs of a working adult in a corporate or higher education setting? Question2. What areas of needs analysis might be similar?

Critical Read questions listed. Reply showing evidence of critical analysis with questions to. Include enough detail to substantiate your thinking as well as your position on the questions or comments. Included Proper in-text citation. Reply to each separately.

In your own words, comment on Keith Miller and Latina Morris “attached reply discussions.” Your response should address the DB questions listed and move the conversation forward. Provide quality of your postings, including mastery of the concept as well as critical thinking. If asked for your opinion, do not simply state that it is a good or bad idea; elaborate on your reasons and argument. Include enough detail to substantiate your thinking as well as your position on the questions or comments.  . Reply to each separately. Part I. Question 1. What do you think are the differences between analyzing the instructional needs of a learner in a traditional K–12 school versus analyzing the instructional needs of a working adult in a corporate or higher education setting? Question2. What areas of needs analysis might be similar?

Part I
What do you think are the differences between analyzing the instructional needs of a learner in a traditional K–12 school versus analyzing the instructional needs of a working adult in a corporate or higher education setting? What areas of needs analysis might be similar?

Discussion Board Unit 2
Latina Morris
AIU

Part I
What do you think are the differences between analyzing the instructional needs of a learner in a traditional K–12 school versus analyzing the instructional needs of a working adult in a corporate or higher education setting? What areas of needs analysis might be similar?

The difference of analyzing the instructional needs of a k-12 type learner versus a working adult or higher learner  is, in a k-12 environment  teachers can use instructional design to outline and guide pupils into establishing and categorizing their thoughts, ideas, and the information they learn into categories or levels of importance. Teachers are also modeling through lectures and instructions what and how the pupils should be learning.  Teachers are preparing and molding the learners to organize their thoughts and objectives through  instructional design.
Adult learners or persons in a higher educational setting are usually lifelong learners and can voluntary choose what way the learn and how the learn. They are more of constructive learners and they are usually building upon or expanding knowledge they have already learned in their primary education.

References
Adult learning. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://adulted.about.com/od/intro/Adult_Learning.htm

EDU604 Unit 2 Part 1
Keith Miller
AIU
November 26, 2014

An important aspect for initiating the instructional design process is to know your audience. Knowing your audience identifies who we are designing the training for and the desired learning outcome. Many instructional principles and methods exist, with the most appropriate method being dependent on the type of information or skills to be learned (Knowles, & Suh, 2005). The information acquired while analyzing the instructional needs for a particular audience will identify the differences needed in the instructional design for the desired learning outcome. There are many unique characteristics to consider t ensure the instructional design program matches the needs of learners. Keeping in mind the type of audience may have the learning objective in common and require different strategies within the program design to achieve those objectives effectively. A few things you need to keep in mind while analyzing the instructional needs are the target groups characteristics, pedagogical considerations, delivery style, learning constraints, and desired learning objectives.

A classroom’s environmental, emotional, sociological, and physical features can influence student attitude about learning and learning itself (Logan, 2011). Analyzing the instructional need for traditional school students can obtain as many different factors as instructional needs for adult learners due to diversities in the learners’ environment. To distinguish instructional needs between traditional students and adult learners in general can be as complex as distinguishing between traditional students who have different cultures and back grounds. Prior experience the learner has obtained along with what motivates or stimulates their desire to learn can be a little more easily defined between traditional students and adult learners. It is naturally assumed that adult learners will possess greater amounts of experience and their motivation and stimulus factors will be apparently different. Because their learning outcome or objectives to be learned can be similar the instructional needs may also have common similarities with modifications in delivery methods

During the analysis for instructional needs of the traditional student and adult learners it would be beneficial to construct and design a program with broad parameters focused on the differences that are most apparent such as age, previous experience, and motivation. Using the ADDIE Model will assist in revising or modifying the program for effectiveness and efficiency as you observe behavior and conduct the final phase of Evaluation. Over thinking of the instructional needs for the learner will not only cause the educator more time and effort in the overall design, but could also focus the design towards a particular group that is a minority of the target group as a whole.

References

Knowles, M. P., & Suh, S. (2005). Performance systems analysis: Learning by doing. Performance Improvement, 44(4), 35-            42. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/237233203?accountid=144459

Logan, B. (2011). Examining differentiated instruction: Teachers respond. Research in Higher Education Journal, 13, 1-14.
Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/889136509?accountid=144459

Paper Title
Author
Name of the University
Submission Date

Abstract
The abstract is written in block format, meaning that the start of the paragraph is not indented.  It begins on the next line following the Abstract heading and should not be more than 250 words.  As an undergraduate, it is suggested that you verify the length of the abstract with your instructor (it is usually a FULL paragraph), but a graduate student must adhere to the 120 to 250 word abstract.  The Abstract heading should NOT be in bold.  All numbers in an abstract should be typed as digits and not as words unless they are at the beginning of a sentence.  The abstract is a one-paragraph summary of the most important elements of the paper.  This is an example of what an abstract looks like in a paper.  Remember, it usually takes a minimum of 5 sentences to make a paragraph. If your paper is too short to warrant an abstract, delete this page and omit the title on the next page.

Title of Paper
The title of the paper is centered on the first line of the third page and is in uppercase and lowercase letters.  Do not italicize the title, bold it, or put it in quotes. The introductory paragraph begins on the line following the title of the paper.  The entire paper, including the title page, abstract, body, and references, should be double-spaced.  The before/after paragraphs spacing should be set on zero and the margins should be one inch.
In order to give proper credit to the ideas and words of others, any outside sources used in the body of the paper must be documented by citing the author(s) and copyright date of the source(s).  This is called a citation.  Each citation must have a corresponding full source reference on the references page that follows the body of the paper.  As noted by Stevens (2008), a signal phrase “signals to the reader that either a direct quote or a paraphrase is about to follow” (p. 43).  This is an in-text citation.  As in this example, when the name of the author is part of the sentence, the year of the publication appears in parentheses directly following the author’s name, e.g., Stevens (2008).  When the author of a source is not mentioned in the sentence, both the author and year of publication appear in parentheses (Stevens, 2008, p. 54). This is a parenthetical in-text citation.   If a work has two authors, both authors are cited in each citation of that source.  For a citation of a source with two authors, use the last names of both authors separated by an ampersand (&).  When no author is listed, use the title.  If the title is extremely long, one may shorten it to the first 4 words of the title and place them in quotation marks.  If the headings are too long to use in your in-text citation use a shortened version in quotation marks like this: (Lorraine, 2009, “Stock market trends,” para. 56). When no publication date is listed, use the abbreviation n.d, which stands for no date.  When a direct quote is taken from a source with page numbers, such as a book, magazine, or newspaper, include the page number as part of the citation.  If the quote is fewer than 40 words, it should be enclosed in double quotation marks and should be incorporated into the formal structure of the sentence.
If the quotation that you are using is more than 40 words long, you must use a block quotation.  This is a block paragraph.  In a block paragraph, you should not use any quotations at all unless they are needed to indicate a quotation within the original text. (“APA Block Quotation,” n.d.)  Note: Citations that start with titles are in quotes and the title can be shortened but should also be in quotes to designate that it is a title.
If you have a direct quote but your source does not have page numbers but does give paragraph numbers, then you would give the paragraph number to show where you found your quote.  It would look like this: (Franklin, 2009, para. 9).   If there are not any page numbers or paragraph numbers but headings are given, then give the heading and the number of the paragraph that follows it.  You will need to count the paragraphs yourself since the numbers are not given.  That would look like this: (Franklin, 2009, Past Research section, para. 9).
The references section begins on a new page.  The heading is centered on the first line of the new page.  It is not in bold, not in italics, nor underlined. The references, which are double spaced, have a hanging indent and begin on the line following the references heading.  Entries are organized alphabetically by whatever comes first in the reference (author last name or first word of title). Go to the next page to see an example of a reference page.

References
APA block quotation. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.rpi.edu/web/writingcenter /wc_web/school/apa_block_quotation.htm
Cuddy, M. F., & Fisher, E. R. (2010). Investigation of the roles of gas-phase CF2 molecules and F atoms during fluorocarbon plasma processing of Si and ZrO2 substrates. Journal of Applied Physics, 108(3), 033303. doi:10.1063/1.3467776
Stevens, J.R. (2008). The signal phrase. Retrieved from http://www.englishdiscourse.org
/signal.html

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