Cultural Activity Report

Cultural Activity Report

Order Description

As a way of experiencing the Humanities beyond your classroom, computer, and textbook, you are asked to do a certain type of “cultural activity” that fits well with our course and then report on your experience. Your instructor will require you to propose an activity and get instructor approval before you do it and report on it (students should look for any instructions in that respect). Every effort should be made to ensure that this is a hands-on experience (not a virtual one), that this activity fits the HUM 111 class well, and that the activity is of sufficient quality for this university course. The two (2) key types of activities are a museum visit or a performance. Note: This must not be a report on the same activity (and certainly not the same report) as done for another class, like HUM 112. For instance, one might go to the same museum as done for HUM 112, but this HUM 111 report will focus on entirely different works and displays.

Visit a museum or gallery exhibition or attend a theater or musical performance before the end of Week 5. The activity (museum or performance) should have content that fits our course well. Have fun doing this.
Write a two to three (2) page report (500 words) that describes your experience.
Clearly identify the event location, date attended, the attendees, and your initial reaction upon arriving at the event.
Provide specific information and a description of at least two (2) pieces (e.g., art, exhibits, music, etc.).
Provide a summary of the event and describe your overall reaction after attending the event.
Use at least the class text as a reference (additional sources are fine, not necessary unless required by your content). Your report should include connections you make between things observed in your activity and things learned in the course and text.

Attending a Performance
Check your local colleges to see if there are any free or low-cost performances or student recitals. Student performances are generally of almost the same quality as professional performances, but typically cost much less. However, performances of high school level or lower will not meet this requirement.
A performance that is relevant to a HUM 111 course is more difficult to find than a performance that would be relevant to HUM 112 (which covers from 1600 to the present). However, our course does cover Shakespeare and Greek tragedy and drama, so any performances of those will work. Note: One can sometimes find music performances of music from the Renaissance or Reformation period, or even earlier.
Any questions about whether a performance activity fits the course and assignment well enough will be decided by the instructor when the student seeks approval for an activity. Any alternative activity outside the normal ones listed here, such as for those limited by disability or distance, will be determined by the instructor. Generally, we do not expect students to travel over an hour to get to an approved activity.
Unlike visiting a museum, where you can wear almost anything, people attending performances are often expected to “dress up” a bit.
Take a pen or pencil with you and accept the program you are offered by the usher; you will probably want to take notes on it during or after the performance.
Turn off your cell phone before entering the auditorium. Do not use your phone to record the music or to take pictures or videos. To play it safe, turn the phone off.
Most long musical performances have at least one (1) intermission. If the lights start blinking, it is a sign that the performance is about to begin.
Look for very specific things (such as a particular piece of music or the way certain instruments sounded at a specific time) which tend to stand out as either enjoyable or not enjoyable. Be sure to take notes of the things which you find enjoyable as well as the things which are not enjoyable.