Customer Relationship Management

Customer Relationship Management

Project description
Coursework Report Section 1
(Word guide of 3000 words excluding tables, diagrams and references).
You must produce a detailed exploration of one of the following topics:
1.The effect of intercommunication between employees and the impact they have on customer relationships.
2.An assessment of CRM technology and its impact on customer communication in multi-channel settings.
3.Why understanding business processes are essential to delivering successful CRM project initiatives.
4.Workflow as business processes: how and why are they captured within CRM application software.
5.Organisational behaviour defined as strategy, tactics and operations and the effect these have on CRM software implementation.
6.Customer retention: is it sales, marketing or both?
7.Requirements, capture, management and handling from a CRM perspective: what happens it all goes wrong?
8.CRM and data handling: an issue of consistency.
9.Customer profiling and service experience how to profile and deliver expected customer experience.
10.An assessment of the customer lifecycle and its impact on business processes.
11.CRM and b2b relationships: are the principles supported in leading SaaS CRM products?
12.The effect of supplier relationships on customer relationships.
13.Is CRM only an IT initiative?
14.What are the further directions for CRM as communication technology advances?

Coursework Report Section 2
(Word guide of 2500 words excluding evaluation criteria, tables and diagrams).
You must produce an assessment of a leading CRM software application in context of a specific case example. (Microsoft CRM – Which i have access to I have a user and password that i will pass to you)
Assessment Criteria
The University admissions manager has defined the following specific criteria, which relates to particular activities that must be checked within the MS CRM software. Justification using case examples and specific test data should be considered for each specific criterion.
(Finding and using Records – Using Activities – Duplicate detection – Using Leads and opportunities – Marketing list – Campaigns and cases – Using Dashboards – Using Processes )

In additional to specific criteria, the following generic criteria should be considered, ideally in light of other commercial CRM products.

Ethical and privacy issues: Ensuring data governance is essential when dealing with applicant personal information. Consideration of information assurance should be considered.
Reporting capability: Operational CRM will be used to support management reporting. Accordingly, what range of reporting functions are available?
Customisation: What packaged functionality must be adjusted (i.e. customised) to address admissions needs using the options available within Microsoft Dynamics CRM? Discussion about customisation options should be included in the assessment.
Familiar user interface: It is expected that the interface should have the same look and feel as admissions office software. An assessment of the interface availability in terms of familiarity is important.
Scalability and stability: the system must be scaled from a small to a large user base and a small to a high number of applicants, so it must cope with expected demand for three to five years.

Conclude by discussing how MS CRM compares to other CRM solutions currently available in the market.

Deliverables
You should consider all of the specific and generic criteria. The report must be written in a succinct manner. As required you should link justification to admissions example data, and you should avoid over description. Screen shoots are expected to reduce the word count and further illustrate the performance of the Dynamics CRM against key criteria.

A section must be included at the end of the report summarising your assessment and whether MS Dynamics CRM is appropriate.

Customer Relationship Management Systems

Coursework specification

Aims
This coursework is designed to support students in expressing their theoretical and practical knowledge concerning Customer Relationship Management (CRM). Students are expected to show a command of CRM theory, by critically discussing a selected CRM related question/issue (see Appendix A). In addition, students should be able to express how requirement needs can be mapped onto a specific CRM solutions (see Appendix B). Assessment is made in the form of a report that must include two separate sections: the first section is an exploration of a chosen topic; the second section is an evaluation of a customisable CRM application (i.e. MS Dynamics CRM).

Objectives
You must produce a report consisting of two sections. The first section is a detailed exploration of a chosen topic (see possible coursework titles in Appendix A). The second section includes an assessment of a leading CRM software application (see Appendix B), in context of a specific case example.

Assessable outcomes and how they are linked to the coursework
1.    Recognise and appreciate the impact of CRM on organisations and industries (assessed in Section 1).
2.    Understand the concept and principles of CRM and CRM systems (assessed in either Section 1 or 2).
3.    Articulate the business requirements for CRM and transform the business requirements onto CRM systems’ functionality (assessed in Section 2).
4.    Examine critically the techniques for development of CRM systems (assessed in section 1), and be aware of ethical and privacy issues in CRM (assessed in Section 2).
5.    Be familiar with a chosen CRM commercial software package for operational and reporting functions (assessed in Section 2).

Coursework Report Structure
The following report structure can be used as a guide, yet structure is not formally assessed. It is expected that you will choose headings commensurate with your chosen topic.

Section 1 – CRM theory
1.    Introduction:
•    Aims
•    Objectives
2.    Literature review – relating to the topic of choice (see appendix A);
3.    Detailed exploration of a chosen CRM topic and its implication within organisational settings
4.    Conclusion
5.    References – i.e. sources linked within text.

Section 2 – Assessment of leading CRM software application
1.    Introduction:
•    Aims
•    Objectives
1.    Evaluation criteria (listed in the case study – see appendix B):
•    Specific
•    Generic

2.    Conclusion and Recommendations
3.    References

Allocation of marks
Coursework Report – Section 1                            60%
(Word guide of 3000 words – excluding tables, diagrams and references).

Coursework Report – Section 2                            40%
(Word guide of 2500 words – excluding evaluation criteria, tables and diagrams).

Requirements for a pass
Students will be required to obtain a mark of 50% overall based on the coursework.

General marking criteria
•    Pass criteria – To pass this module, students must demonstrate their overall knowledge, understanding and perception of the general concepts and principles of CRM. They should also be able to describe a CRM application.

•    Merit criteria – To achieve a merit distinction mark students must exhibit good context specific knowledge of concepts and principles of CRM. Student should be able to demonstrate a good understanding of CRM application use.

•    Distinction criteria – To achieve a distinction mark students must exhibit their original thoughts and critical-analysis ability in designing solutions and problem-solving ability in making design decisions.

Detailed Marking Criteria
LO    <49%    50% – 59% (Pass)    60% – 69% (Merit)    >70% (Distinction)
1    Report does not address organisational impact of CRM and CRM systems.  Chosen topic does not relate back to organisational impact.    Report covers basic features of impact of CRM and CRM systems on organisations.  Chosen topic loosely relates to organisational impact but important associations are missing.    Report identifies up-to-date themes linked to the impact of CRM on organisations.  Some attempt made at being novel.  Chosen topic clearly discussed in relation to organisational impact.    Report identifies up-to-date themes linked to the impact of CRM on organisations but also identifies new trends based upon current literature.  Discussion for the chosen topic clearly relates to organisational impact whilst taking into account future trends such as those reported in current research.
2    Not all areas of CRM and CRM systems understood.  Some key principles addressed but many are misunderstood.    Report demonstrates broad understanding of CRM and CRM systems.  Able to discuss some important features of CRM.
Admissions Case Study provides evidence of broad understanding of CRM systems with some attempt shown to provide more detail on some features.    Report demonstrates broad understanding of CRM and CRM systems coupled with an ability to discuss some important features in detail that relate to the literature review.
Admissions Case Study provides evidence of broad and some detailed understanding of CRM systems.    Report demonstrates broad understanding of CRM and CRM systems coupled with an in-depth knowledge of relevant CRM issues.
Admissions Case Study provides evidence of broad and detailed understanding of features and techniques associated with CRM systems.
3    Understanding of business requirements in a CRM context not shown.  Poor attempt shown in trying to reconcile business requirements with CRM functionality    Able to distil most of the business requirements as laid out in case study and generate an evaluative report based upon the identified criteria.    Able to distil all the business requirements as laid out in the case study, show some attempt at explicating the criteria further to provide a reasonably detailed assessment.

Able to distil all of the business requirements as laid out in the case study, explicate where required the criteria further to provide a detailed and soundly argued assessment.
4    Critical examination missing.  Mostly prescriptive work.  No attempt made to go beyond a basic literature review nor to address fully an analysis of the chosen topic. Ethical and privacy issues ignored or do not match CRM contexts.    Demonstration of a firm foundation of the techniques for developing CRM systems by describing them coupled with some critique supported by some case study examples. Ethical and privacy issues recognised in the case study evaluation report.    Demonstration of a firm foundation of the techniques for developing CRM systems.  Expertise shown in two or three areas (linked to case study criteria) coupled with a sound critique. Case study examples used appropriately. Ethical and privacy issues recognised in many areas of the case study evaluation report as they are linked to some of the case study assessment criteria.    Demonstration of a firm foundation of the techniques for developing CRM systems, and expertise shown in the majority of areas (linked to case study criteria) coupled with a robust critique. Case study examples used effectively so that no fault can be found. Ethical and privacy issues recognised in all areas of the case study evaluation report as they are linked to all relevant areas of the case study assessment criteria.
5    Case study evaluation report (section 2) incomplete and broad understanding of CRM systems not shown.    Case study evaluation report that demonstrates a broad understanding with some areas showing extra detail linked to operational (operational CRM) and reporting functions.    Case study evaluation report that demonstrates a broad understanding and some additional areas of detail linked to operational (operational CRM) and reporting functions.    Case study evaluation report that demonstrates a broad and detailed understanding linked to operational (operational CRM) and reporting functions.

APPENDIX A

Coursework titles

1.    The effect of intercommunication between employees and the impact they have on customer relationships.

2.    An assessment of CRM technology and its impact on customer communication in multi-channel settings.

3.    Why understanding business processes are essential to delivering successful CRM project initiatives.

4.    Workflow as business processes: how and why are they captured within CRM application software.

5.    Organisational behaviour defined as strategy, tactics and operations and the effect these have on CRM software implementation.

6.    Customer retention: is it sales, marketing or both?

7.    Requirements, capture, management and handling from a CRM perspective: what happens it all goes wrong?

8.    CRM and data handling: an issue of consistency.

9.    Customer profiling and service experience – how to profile and deliver expected customer experience.

10.    An assessment of the customer lifecycle and its impact on business processes.

11.    CRM and b2b relationships: are the principles supported in leading SaaS CRM products?

12.    The effect of supplier relationships on customer relationships.

13.    Is CRM only an IT initiative?

14.    What are the further directions for CRM as communication technology advances?

APPENDIX B
UoR Admissions
An assessment to support Operational CRM provision

Introduction
In line with central University strategy, the University of Reading (UoR) admissions team wants to implement operational CRM as a front-end solution; using a CRM platform to provide a standard view of applicants, and the integrated management of information in a multi-channelled setting. The proposed solution must take into account that a relatively small team is responsible for managing thousands of applications. The same team will also be responsible in future for creating recruitment campaigns to identify new student leads, and turn application into concrete student numbers.

Admissions Background
Admissions processes at the University of Reading were traditionally processed within separate faculties and schools. Different schools, however, interacted with applicants using very different processes, which left applicants with a wide range of interaction experiences. In light of the Browne report, and inline with central university strategy, a recent decision was made by the University to centralise admissions processes. The newly appointed head of admissions decided to run a series of focus groups, which allowed existing processes to be captured. After considerable consultation with admissions stakeholders across the university, the following centralised process was developed:

“In the new admissions process there are four interacting stakeholders (i.e. the applicant, the admissions processing team, the admissions approver, and the decision maker), who are supported by a new online website that is integrated with RISIS; which stands for Reading Integrated Student Information System and is the University’s name for a combination of databases that hold academic and personal data for students.

The applicant submits the application through the online application website, which ensures that all mandatory fields are defined. RISIS automatically acknowledges the application, and the information is sent to the decision maker. The decision maker assesses whether a final decision can be made. If additional information is required, the decision-maker either: arranges an interview with the applicant by sending out an invitation via RISIS; requests further information from the applicant; or requests advice from admissions staff. When the applicant receives the invitation to an interview s/he is required to log onto the online website, and arrange a mutual time. After the interview, the decision maker will add information to the online application to support decision justification. If further information is required from the applicant then the applicant will receive a request for information, which requires them logging onto the online form and completing an online form. The decision maker is informed that additional information has been received. If the decision maker has asked for advice from admissions staff, either/both the admissions processing team and/or admissions approver may receive a request for advise, which will be provided online; at which point the decision maker will be notified.

Once a decision can be made the application is either rejected, or an offer is made. If rejected a reason is selected and additional notes can be added by the decision maker if required. The decision-maker submits the decision and the admissions processing team code the application as a rejection; which generates an automatic rejection email in RISIS that is sent to the applicant. The application is released to the website by the admission processing team, which means the applicant can see the decision online.  If an offer is given, the decision maker is given the option to add additional internally accessible notes relating to reason / conditions, etc. Feedback text can be provided back to the applicant. The offer is submitted by the decision maker, which is subsequently coded onto RISIS by admissions processing staff; including information about conditions, alternative courses, etc. When the admission team submits the final offer, the admissions approver reviews it and makes any amendments as required. Once the offer is approved, the admissions approver sends the offer email to the applicant.  The offer is then released, which means the applicant can see the offer online.

If there is an English language condition, and the degree can be bundled with ISLC courses, then the admission processing team will automatically send out information about ISLC bundles courses. If the condition cannot be bundled, then information about stand-alone ISLC language courses will be sent out.”.

UoR admissions have been considering a CRM solution since 2012. Within that time the university has developed a strong analytical CRM solution, with not only a repository linked to RISIS but also data-mining models supporting customer segmentation. In 2014, the Head of Admissions confirmed that an operational CRM solution was required, however evaluation of potential solutions is required. The selected solution must increase the efficiency of the team of employees responsible for applications yet also provide support to management reporting and future recruitment opportunities.

Microsoft Dynamics CRM assessment approach
The admissions team is now committed to implementation of an operational CRM as a front-end system, and the project has received priority from top-level management.  Before it can start, however, proposed solutions must be thoroughly evaluated. Microsoft Dynamics CRM has been suggested as a potential solution, since it potentially enables the development of an operational CRM front-end solution to provide multi-views of applicants and an integrated approach in the management of multi-channel recruitment campaigns.

You are expected to signup for a one-month MS dynamics CRM online trial to undertake the evaluation. Non-specific test data will be made available as part of this trial. Specific test data should be created where required to support the consideration of specific and generic criteria.

Assessment Criteria
The University of Reading admissions manager has defined the following specific criteria, which relates to particular activities that must be checked within the MS CRM software. Justification using case examples and specific test data should be considered for each specific criterion.
•    Finding and using Records.
•    Using Activities.
•    Duplicate detection.
•    Using Leads and opportunities.
•    Marketing list.
•    Campaigns and cases.
•    Using Dashboards.
•    Using Processes.

In additional to specific criteria, the following generic criteria should be considered, ideally in light of other commercial CRM products.

•    Ethical and privacy issues: Ensuring data governance is essential when dealing with applicant personal information. Consideration of information assurance should be considered.
•    Reporting capability: Operational CRM will be used to support management reporting. Accordingly, what range of reporting functions are available?
•    Customisation: What packaged functionality must be adjusted (i.e. customised) to address admissions needs using the options available within Microsoft Dynamics CRM? Discussion about customisation options should be included in the assessment.
•    Familiar user interface: It is expected that the interface should have the same look and feel as admission’s office software. An assessment of the interface availability in terms of familiarity is important.
•    Scalability and stability: the system must be scaled from a small to a large user base and a small to a high number of applicants, so it must cope with expected demand for three to five years.

Conclude by discussing how MS CRM compares to other CRM solutions currently available in the market.

Deliverables
You should consider all of the specific and generic criteria. The report must be written in a succinct manner. As required you should link justification to admissions example data, and you should avoid over description. Screen shoots are expected to reduce the word count and further illustrate the performance of the Dynamics CRM against key criteria.

A section must be included at the end of the report summarising your assessment and whether MS Dynamics CRM is appropriate.