History Outline with an Argumentative essay

History Outline with an Argumentative essay

Order Description
The assignment is a two part. An History Outline and Argumentative Essay. I have provided the all required instructions. The writing attachment provides detail for the assignment. The Topic is also provided, important information is highlighted (instruction).
US ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLLEGE
US Army Command and General Staff School
Command and General Staff Officer Course (CGSOC) Common Core
H100: Rise of the Western Way of WarBlock

Annex A

Concise DMHStyle Guide

This guide addresses common errors in citing references, usingquotations, bibliographic entries, and paraphrasing.

References

Student Text 22-2(ST 22-2) [PDF is located in the Blackboard Master Library under Student Texts.] is the primary reference for writing at CGSC. DMH uses the examples in Kate Turabian’s A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations(eighth edition) as the standard for footnotes, endnotes, and bibliographic entries. This generally follows the same style as the Prentice-Hall Handbook for Writers(also refer to The Gregg Reference Manual: A Manual of Style, Grammar, Usage, and Formatting [eleventh edition]), but Turabian has more detailed examples.

Footnotes or Endnotes

DMH accepts either footnotes or endnotes but not in-text or parenthetical citations. Footnotes and endnotes are not part of the word count requirement for the essay. Number footnotes and endnotes sequentially (1, 2, 3, etc.) according to their placement in the essay; do not reuse a footnote or endnote number simply because it refers to the same source.

Ideas or data forming the core of common knowledge do not require citation. Careful citation of all other ideas, data, and quotations is especially important when paraphrasing and should protect the writer from the possibility of plagiarism.

The only acceptable form of endnotes and footnotes are the examples in ST 22-2.(For further examples, see: Turabian, Kate L. A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2013.) DMH does not accept parenthetical documentation inserted into the text of an essay. An example of this unacceptable style would be “(Gabel, 1992, p. 144.).”

Subsequent References to Previously Cited Material in Footnotes or Endnotes

When citing referencespreviously cited in fullin earlier footnotes or endnotes:

Use Ibid. (from ibidem, “in the same place”; always takes a period) when referring to the identical source and page number as in the previous source (footnote or endnote immediately preceding the current footnote or endnote). For example:
1 James Willbanks, Abandoning Vietnam: How America Left and South Vietnam Lost Its War (Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 2004), 46.
2 Ibid.

Use Ibid. and the page number, if only the page number differs from the immediately preceding reference. For example:

1 James Willbanks, Abandoning Vietnam: How America Left and South Vietnam Lost Its War (Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 2004), 46.
2Ibid., 24.

The second, nonconsecutive reference to a work already cited in full requires an abbreviated format: last name of author, shortened title of book, page number. This makes it easier for the reader to identify when you are introducing a new source.For example:

2 James Willbanks, Abandoning Vietnam: How America Left and South Vietnam Lost Its War, (Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 2004), 46.
14 Willbanks, Abandoning Vietnam, 48.

Direct Quotations

Authors should enclose direct quotations of less than three lines in quotation marks inside the main text. See examples inST 22-2. Failure to cite a direct quotation is plagiarism. Set quotations of three or more lines apart from the text by indenting and single-spacing them without quotation marks. The superscript endnote or footnote number usually appears at the end of such indented text.

Bibliography

A bibliography is required only if sources other than course materials are used. The bibliography should follow the endnotes (if used), or the last page of text if footnotes are used. Arrangebibliography alphabetically(last name first) and groupaccording to type of source (books, Internet, periodicals, etc.). Use the style in Turabian, Prentice-Hall (also refer to The Gregg Reference Manual), and ST 22-2.

Internet and Electronic Sources

Citation of Internet and electronic sources remains in transition. The principal rule is that the source must be traceable, so that the reader can locate that source. If you are in doubt as to the site’s stability or longevity, download and print the file. If you have any questions, consult your advisor for guidance. Commonly cited information includes the source of the site (generally an organization or individual), title, date website last revised, web address, and date accessed.(See examples below for format.)Researchers beware. While information found in books and scholarly journals isroutinely subject to scholarly review, the same level of fact checking and evaluation may be lacking for information and articles on the Internet. For that reason, do NOT use Wikipedia or similar uncontrolled sources for information.
EXAMPLE BIBLIOGRAPHY AND NOTE FORMAT

The following examples illustrate the appropriate documentation for works commonly cited by CGSC students and not addressed specifically in the above references. These arethe accepted formats for such entries. Otherwise, use the examples in Turabian, Prentice-Hall (also refer to The Gregg Reference Manual), and ST 22-2.

1. Field Manual

Bibliography:
US Department of the Army.FM 25-100, Training the Force.Washington,DC: Government Printing Office. November 1988.

Note:
1US Department of the Army, FM 25-100, Training the Force (Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, November 1988), 121.

2. Book of Readings

Bibliography:
Clausewitz, Carl von. “What is War?” On War. Princeton, NJ:PrincetonUniversity Press, 1976, 75–89.Excerpt reprinted in US Army Command andGeneral Staff College, H100 Book of Readings, 50–61. Fort Leavenworth, KS:USACGSC, July 1992.

Note:
1Carl von Clausewitz, “What is War?” On War (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1976), 75–89; excerpt reprinted in US Army Command and General Staff College, H100 Book of Readings (Fort Leavenworth, KS: USACGSC, July 1992), 55.

[List author by first name first in the note and last name first in the alphabetical bibliography.]

Bibliography:
Howard, Michael. “Military Science in an Age of Peace.”RUSI, Journal of theRoyal United Services Institute for Defence Studies 119 (March 1974): 3–9.Reprinted in US Army Command and General Staff College, H100 Book ofReadings, 205–11. Fort Leavenworth,KS: USACGSC, July 1992.

Note:
1 Michael Howard, “Military Science in an Age of Peace,” RUSI, Journal of the Royal United ServicesInstitute for Defence Studies 119 (March 1974); reprinted in US Army Command and General Staff College, H100 Book of Readings (Fort Leavenworth: USACGSC, July 1992), 210.

3. Books

Your research may require the use of individual pages and/or chapters within a book written by different authors and edited by someone other than the author. The following example is a chapter from a book used throughout the course:

Bibliography:
Herwig, Holger H. “Innovation Ignored: The Submarine Problem—Germany, Britain, and the United States, 1919–1939.” In Military Innovation in the Interwar Period, edited by Williamson Murray and Allan R. Millett, 227–264. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1996.

Note:
1Holger H. Herwig, “Innovation Ignored: The Submarine Problem—Germany, Britain, and the United States, 1919–1939,” in Military Innovation in the Interwar Period, ed. Williamson Murray and Allan R. Millett (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1996), 229.

4. Journal Articles

Following is an example using a common source (Military Review) of research topics and information.

Bibliography:
Karcher, Timothy M. “The Victory Disease.” Military Review 83 (July–August 2003): 9–17.

Note:
2Timothy M. Karcher, “The Victory Disease,” Military Review 83 (July–August 2003): 11.

5. Leavenworth Papers

Following is an example using a common source from the Leavenworth Papers series of professional writings.

Bibliography:
Doughty, Robert A. The Evolution of US Army Tactical Doctrine, 1946–76. Leavenworth Papers No. 1. Fort Leavenworth, KS: Combat Studies Institute, 1979. (Reprinted 2001)

Note:
3Robert A. Doughty, The Evolution of US Army Tactical Doctrine, 1946–76, Leavenworth Papers No. 1 (Fort Leavenworth, KS: Combat Studies Institute, 1979, reprinted 2001), 28.

6. Electronic and Web-based Sources

Bibliography:
US Department of the Army, Center For Army Lessons Learned. Urban Combat Operations—References. Fort Leavenworth, KS: Center for Army Lessons Learned, 2002. CD ROM; available from CALL.

Note:
4Department of the Army, Center For Army Lessons Learned. Urban Combat Operations—References (Fort Leavenworth, KS: Center for Army Lessons Learned, 2002) [CD ROM]; available from CALL.

Bibliography:
Royal Air Force.The Battle of Britain History Site.The Battle of Britain—Commanders.Delta Web International, 2000.http://www.raf.mod.uk/history/thebattleofbritain.cfm(accessed [date]).

Note:
5Royal Air Force. The Battle of Britain History Site.The Battle of Britain— Commanders (Delta Web International, 2000) http://www.raf.mod.uk/history/thebattleofbritain.cfm(accessed [date]).

Bibliography:
Paret, Peter, ed. Makers of Modern Strategy: from Machiavelli to the Nuclear Age. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1986. Kindle edition, 2007.

Note:
6Felix Gilbert, “Machiavelli: The Renaissance of the Art of War.” In Makers of Modern Strategy: from Machiavelli to the Nuclear Age. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1986, chap. 1. Kindle edition, 2007.
US ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLLEGE
US Army Command and General Staff School
Command and General Staff Officer Course (CGSOC) Common Core
H100: Rise of the Western Way of War Block

Annex B

Documentation Guide

Writing assignments at the US Army Command and General Staff College (CGSC) should reflect graduate-level scholarship. This work builds on the ideas and research of others, adding to a community of scholars founded on mutual respect. That respect is most often expressed through scholarly documentation,giving credit to those whose work has shaped subsequent thinking and contributed to further scholarly production. An author who fails to give credit to the work of othersindicatesthat the idea came from the present author’s analysis or research. This is a form of intellectual dishonesty that is not acceptable in any profession.It is especially egregious in the profession of arms, which is built on assumptions of character, good judgment, and trust.

Documentation takes several forms, which includes endnotes, footnotes, and bibliographies. History papers require endnotes or footnotes (both are acceptable in Department of Military History (DMH) assignments— choose one or the other) as well as a bibliography.

Endnotes and footnotes serve three important purposes: (1) give credit to those who contributed to the development of the author’s ideas and argument; (2) enable the reader to locate the source of material they find particularly interesting, insightful, or controversial; and (3) add credibility to the author’s argument by showing that an assertion of fact or an idea is based on reliable scholarship. All three purposes are important, but giving credit to sources is the most important function of endnotes and footnotes, and the omission or improper use of endnotes and footnotes is the fastest way to undermine scholarly credibility.

When to use footnotes or endnotes:

1. When quoting directly from a book, article, speech, or online source (DMH encouragesverylimited use of direct quotations in written assignments. Assigned essays are intended to assess your ability to express yourself, not to copy the prose of some professional author or speaker.)

2. When paraphrasing from another work

Example:

[Original] “Seeckt’s decisions in 1919 and 1920 played an essential role in creating an organization that could innovate within the realistic parameters of technology and tactical doctrine.”
[Bad paraphrase] “Seeckt’s decisions right after World War I played a key role in creating an organization that could innovate within the realistic parameters of technology and tactical doctrine.” [This is too close to the original,copying the basic structure of the original while changing only a handful of words.]

[Good paraphrase]“More than any other figure, Hans von Seeckt created an organizational environment that encouraged realism in the development of new weapons and doctrine.” [This sentence captures the original idea while putting it in original language and sentence structure.]

For more guidance on paraphrasing see:
http://gethelp.library.upenn.edu/PORT/documentation/paraphrase.html (accessed 3 April 2014)

3. When using a fact or idea that is not common knowledge and that has been taken from a book, article, speech, or online source

Example of common knowledge: The capital of the United States is Washington, DC.

Example of an idea that is not common knowledge: Hans von Seeckt established the intellectual climate that made the development of German mechanized doctrine possible during the interwar period. (General von Seeckt is not a figure wellknown outside scholarly circles and his exact role in the development of the German panzer force is subject to debate. An endnote or footnote is appropriate here.)

A typical CGSC paper will have three or four footnotes or endnotes per page and, in many cases, will need one or more footnotes per paragraph. As a general rule, a three- to five-page paper that has only one or two footnotes is probably not adequately documented. When in doubt, use a footnote or endnote to indicate the source of a fact or idea that is important to your argument.

For more examples of correct scholarly documentation, check professional periodicals such as Joint Force Quarterly, Parameters (from the US Army War College), or CGSC’s professional journal, Military Review.

For guidance on appropriate formats for endnotes, footnotes, and bibliographies, see Annex A.