interrelationship between legal jurisdictions-nuclear fuel-case c 459/03 commission v irelan

interrelationship between legal jurisdictions-nuclear fuel-case c 459/03 commission v irelan

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interrelationship between legal jurisdictions-nuclear fuel-case c 459/03 commission v irelan , and what impact did this decision have on the idea of state sovereignty ?
its the final essay 2000 words , for more details please ask me

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LEX102
Sustainability, Science and the Law
Department of Macquarie Law School
UNIT GUIDE
Session 1, 2015 (internal offering)
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TEACHING STAFF
Unit Convenor and Lecturer
Name:
Dr Kirsten Davies
Phone:
9850 8334
Email:
[email protected]
Office:
Building E7A, Room 717
Consultation hours:
by appointment
Unit Co-Convenor, Lecturer, and Administrator
Name:
Dr Maryam Khalid
Phone:
Contact via email please
Email:
[email protected]
Consultation hours:
Contact via email please
Unit Tutor
Name:
Pradip Royhan
Phone:
Contact via email please
Email:
[email protected]
Office:
Building W3A, Room 439
Consultation hours:
Contact via email or by appointment
Unit Tutor
Name:
Tanzim Afoz
Phone:
Contact via email please
Email:
[email protected]
Office:
Building W3A, Room 341
Consultation hours:
11am – 12 midday
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ABOUT THIS UNIT
The sustainability of human activity is a critical and pressing matter for the world today. Are all the things that we hold dear – human rights, economic prosperity, community justice, and social fulfilment – still achievable when we are running out of resources to live on?
This unit takes a comparative and multidisciplinary perspective on humans and the environment: it critiques the basis and process of environmental policy development, science, politics, ethics, philosophy, and the legal system itself.
We ask how legal innovation can integrate these many perspectives and cross the boundaries of competing disciplines to enhance social ownership and political leadership in these issues.
? We examine science-law relationships, socio-political governance, regulatory design, and capacity building as elements in societal change.
? We consider legislation, court cases, treaties, institutions, and community actors as sources of environmental rights, obligations and influence. No previous knowledge of law will be required.
? We illustrate the main elements of law in key policy areas such as global climate change
Students will be mentored in: analysing bodies of scientific evidence, legal problem-solving, stakeholder analysis, academic research and writing skills, and creativity to develop law and governance reforms addressing a local and global sustainability based on case studies provided from the five pillars of sustainability. Learning will revolve around the progressive building of a major assignment over the course of the semester.
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TOPICS
The Unit will include:
1. An introduction to the principles of Sustainability, Science and the Law and how these interact.
2. The scientific, social, economic and political frameworks that underpin local and global agendas for environmental sustainability (or the lack of it).
3. We will explore key issues, concepts and principles involved in the many legal frameworks which support sustainability and sustainable development. The diversity and complexity of global environmental issues means that the law and regulatory responses to them must include not only environmental law but also other legal frameworks and doctrines such as competition law, indigenous rights and traditional knowledge, corporate regulation and reporting, agricultural and technological regulatory reform, questions of public governance and administrative law, human rights, and democratic participation.
4. Case studies on current issues will be explored, focusing upon the application of the concepts from the first half of the course. Particular issues explored will include: climate change; loss of biodiversity; degradation of habitats; trade and environment; freshwater and marine environmental protection; human rights and indigenous collective rights.
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DELIVERY AND RESOURCES
This unit requires students to attend or listen online (through Echo360) a weekly one-hour lecture. Students are also required to attend a one-hour tutorial each week. External students are encouraged to attend lectures whenever possible.
Student workload, in accordance with university guidelines, is 3 hours per credit point per week (over a 15 week term), and can be estimated as follows:
22 hours – attendance of lectures, tutorials (compulsory for internal students) and online participation ( for external students)
55 hours – readings, review of online content and self-study
63 hours – assessment tasks
PRESCRIBED TEXT AND ADDITIONAL MATERIALS
Prescribed Text:
Elizabeth Fisher, Bettina Lange and Eloise Scotford, Environmental Law: Test, cases sand materials (Oxford University Press, 2013 edition)
This text is available through the Co-op Bookshop ( external students please order through the bookshop). Copies will also be place on reserve through Macquarie University Library.
Additional material:
There are many (free) student resources related to the prescribed text available online: http://www.oup.com.au/titles/higher_ed/law/environmental__and__planning_law/9780195558760
Extra material, including reading lists, will be placed on the unit’s iLearn page. Students are required to access the page regularly to review online content and readings.
UNIT WEBPAGE AND TECHNOLOGY USED AND REQUIRED
Online units can be accessed at: http://ilearn.mq.edu.au/.
PC and Internet access are required. Basic computer skills (e.g. internet browsing) and skills in word processing are also a requirement.
Please consult teaching staff for any further, more specific, requirements.
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LEARNING OUTCOMES
1. Define sustainability and the concept of sustainable development, and demonstrate a thorough understanding of philosophical principles and environmental ethics in sustainability.
2. Define and describe the main issues currently in play in sustainability debates, including examples at local, regional and global levels of interest.
3. Identify the main stakeholders in sustainability, and describe the roles of law, science and society in addressing sustainability issues.
4. Critically assess sustainability issues in multidisciplinary and pluralistic (multi-standpoint) perspectives in terms of science and general sustainability principles.
5. Demonstrate a general knowledge of legal concepts, systems and processes and institutions that regulate environmental values and sustainability practices.
6. Develop viable options for change in the law and other policy dimensions to improve sustainability outcomes, through in-depth legal analysis, creativity and problem solving skills.
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ASSESSMENT TASKS
All assignments are to be delivered electronically in MS Word format via the LEX 102 ILearn site. All files are to be labelled with your name, student number and assignment descriptor e.g. Davies 435712 Assignment 1.
Assessments are marked through Gradebook, and results and comments will be distributed via iLearn.
Task
Weight
Due Date
Linked Learning Outcomes
Linked Graduate Capabilities
Brief Description
Assessment One – essay plan
25%
Friday 20 March (Week 4) at 9pm via iLearn
1,3,5
1,3,7,8,9
Description of selected case study
Assessment Two – online quiz
25%
Friday 24 – Sunday 26 April (Week 7) via iLearn
1,2,3,4,5
1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9
Quiz based on material covered in weeks 2-6 of the course
Assessment Three – research essay
40%
Friday 22 May (Week 11) at 9pm via iLearn
2,3,4,5,6
1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9
Development of the framework from Assignment 1. Expansion of discussion and conclusion.
Participation
10%
Ongoing
1,2,3,4,5
1,2,3,4,5,8,9
In-class discussion (see rubric on iLearn for more info)
Assessment One – Essay Plan
Due Date: 9pm Friday 20 March (Week 4)
Weight: 25%
Word limit: 1200 (excluding reference list / bibliography)
The major written assessments in LEX102 will be based on the five case studies outlined on iLearn. You will select one case study to focus on in the unit – your work for assessments 1 and 3 will be based on this case study. Assessment 1 gives you the opportunity to start preparing for the major assessment for this unit (assessment 3, research essay), and receive feedback that will help you refine your ideas and structure for assessment 3.
Assessment 1 asks you to start researching your essay, think through what you plan to say in your essay, and develop the essential elements of your essay in outline form. Each case study overview (on iLearn) sets out a range of issues raised by the case. Using these issues to
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guide you (and identifying additional relevant issues), you will draft your own essay question – you will use this question in writing assessment 1 and assessment 3.
Assessment 1 should consist of an introductory paragraph, a series of key points with a brief note of supporting material (short quotes from authors, citations of the key texts, several facts that would go with the key point if you were to write it up as a paragraph), and a concluding paragraph.
The introductory paragraph should be no more than around 300 words, and should set out the overarching argument of your essay, and provide some indication of how your essay will proceed. This should be followed by an outline of your key points, supported by key evidence. This should show the reader how the argument would be structured (citing the sources) Key points are like paragraphs in the body of an essay – i.e. each key point is made up of material that you think would make a good paragraph. Aim for at least 4 and no more than 7 key points in your outline. The concluding paragraph should be no more than around 300 words, and should summarise the overarching argument, and discusses the implications and importance of the argument. Make sure to use appropriate referencing, including a bibliography or references list (depending on which referencing system you are using).
Your tutor will provide you with a sample essay plan showing you how the assignment should look
The marking rubric for this assignment is available on iLearn.
Assessment Two – Quiz
Due Date: 9pm Friday 24 – Sunday 26 April (Week 7)
Weight: 25%
Students will be required to demonstrate their knowledge of the material covered in weeks 2-6 (inclusive), by answering 15 multiple choice questions online.
The quiz will be available from 6am on Friday 24 April, until 11:55pm on Sunday 26 April. You must ensure that you will be available to logon to ilearn to complete the quiz during this time. If you will be unable to do this, you must apply for special consideration (with supporting documentation) via https://ask.mq.edu.au.
Once you access the quiz, you will have 30 minutes to complete the quiz. Once 30 minutes have elapsed, your answers will automatically be submitted. Please ensure you have a reliable computer and internet connection before you attempt the quiz.
Assessment Three – Research Essay
Due Date: 5pm Friday 22 May (Week 11)
Weight: 40%
Word limit: 2000 (excluding reference list / bibliography)
Building on the essay plan developed in assessment 1, students will be required to submit a 2000-word essay based on the case study selected for assessment 1.
The essay will assess your ability to research relevant scholarly work on your chosen case study, form a thesis, analyse the available material, and then present a coherent and compelling argument as a polished academic essay. You will have drafted an essay question
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for assessment 1; you can update this question in consultation with your tutor (and the feedback you receive on assessment 1 might suggest this).
Essays should refer to a range of material in addition to the required readings for this unit, and should be correctly and consistently referenced. You must use a minimum of 6 scholarly references (peer-reviewed academic books and journal articles). Avoid relying on non-peer reviewed sources, and avoid websites like blogs. Newspapers can be useful in supporting your scholarly research, but they do not count as scholarly sources themselves.
Special consideration
All requests should be directed via the University’s Ask MQ system.
1. Support
If students are experiencing any difficulties (personal or academic) please discuss with tutors, unit administrator or unit convenor as early as possible so they can offer support. The MQ campus Wellbeing Centre will assist students in need of support. Contact via Ask MQ or: http://students.mq.edu.au/support/health_and_wellbeing/
2. Serious and unavoidable disruptions
When a student suffers a disruption to study which is ‘serious and unavoidable’, they may apply for special consideration. In order to do so, the student must meet the criteria under the Macquarie University “Disruption to Studies” policy and be approved by the Unit Convenor. Applications are made online through: ask.mq.edu.au Outcomes for recognised serious and unavoidable disruptions to studies are as set out in the University schedule – http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/schedule_outcomes.html
3. General disruptions
When a disruption to study is not serious or unavoidable, the approach to special consideration and the impact on student assessments will be as follows:
i. Marked Attendance. It is compulsory for internal students to attend tutorials and lecture attendance is strongly encouraged (roles will be marked in both). If more than two tutorials are missed in any semester, documentation is required (e.g. medical certificate) through Ask MQ to support the case for the student’s absence.
ii. Graded Participation for [tutorial, online]. Marks will be deducted from the final grade for lack of participation in tutorials and on-line discussions for internal students and on-line discussions for external students, unless evidence ( e.g. medical certificate) is provided through Ask MQ that demonstrates how the students’ performance has been impacted.
iii. Assessment (late or non -submission) students will receive a grade of zero if they do not submit an assignment by the due date, unless evidence (e.g. medical certificate) is provided through Ask MQ that demonstrates how the students’
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performance has been impacted. In such cases a time extension may be granted by the unit convenor following consultation with the students tutor, these will be assessed on an individual basis. Requests for time extensions must be submitted before the due date of the assessment task in question.
iv. Ongoing performance When ongoing performance in this unit has been affected by an issue (e.g. prolonged illness) , consideration will be given to the following: extension of time to complete assessment tasks; provision of an additional assessment task; and or a recommendation to withdraw without penalty. This will be negotiated on an individual basis through the unit convenor following evidence (e.g. medical certificate) provided through Ask MQ that demonstrates how the students’ performance has been impacted over a prolonged duration.
Students must acknowledge all materials used, quoted, paraphrased or mentioned.
In referencing, students should comply with the Australian Guide to Legal Citation (3rd edition). The guide is available to download (for free) at: http://www.law.unimelb.edu.au/files/dmfile/FinalOnlinePDF-2012Reprint.pdf
Alternatively students may use any other recognised academic style. For further information, please refer to: https://www.mq.edu.au/on_campus/library/research/referencing/
REFERENCING UNIT SCHEDULE Week Lecture Tutorial Reading and Assessment
Week 1 (Week commencing 23rd Feb)
Introduction
Introduction, survey and assignment support
See iLearn page for all readings
Week 2 (Week commencing 2nd March)
Principles of Sustainability
Topic: Principles of Sustainability and assignment support
Week 3 (Week commencing 9th March)
Principles of Law
Topic: Principles of Law and assignment support
Week 4
(Week commencing 16th March)
The role of Science- connectivity between Sustainability, Science and Law
Topic: The role of Science- connectivity between Sustainability, Science and Law and assignment support
Assignment One due Friday 20 March at 9pm (submitted via iLearn)
Week 5
(Week commencing 23rd March)
Flipped classroom, no lecture this week
Greatest challenge of
Topic: Greatest challenge of sustainability, science and law,
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sustainability, science and law, Global climate change, Professor Lesley Hughes, watch online
Global climate change and assignment support
Week 6
(Week commencing 30th March)
Political influences on sustainability, science and law
Topic :
Political influences on sustainability, science and law and assignment support
Mid –Semester break 7-17th April
Week 7
(Week commencing 20th April)
Customary law
Case study: Customary law in Vanuatu
Topic: lecture discussion and assignment support
Assignment Two (quiz) 24-26 April (access via iLearn)
Week 8 (Week commencing 27th April )
Flipped classroom, no lecture this week
Land and Environment Court Judge Nicola Page video lecture, watch on line, read case study ( wind farm) and complete quiz before tutorial
Discuss lecture and wind farm case study
Week 9
(Week commencing 4th May )
Human rights
Case study
Case study:
Human rights and assignment support
Week 10
(Week commencing 11th May)
Gender
Case study
Topic;
Gender and assignment support
Week 11
(Week commencing 18th May)
Governance and sustainability
Guest speaker:
FBC
Discussion re guest speaker and assignment support
Assignment Three due Friday 22 May at 9pm (submitted via iLearn)
Week 12
(Week commencing 25th May)
Flipped classroom, no lecture this week
Corporate sustainability-Dexter Dunphy. Watch online
Final survey
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EXAMINATION
There are no formal exams for this unit.
READINGS
The list of readings for each week will be provided on the LEX 102 iLearn site
UNIVERSITY POLICY ON GRADING
University Grading Policy
http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/grading/policy.html
The grade a student receives will signify their overall performance in meeting the learning outcomes of a unit of study. Grades will not be awarded by reference to the achievement of other students nor allocated to fit a predetermined distribution. In determining a grade, due weight will be given to the learning outcomes and level of a unit (i.e. 100, 200, 300, 800 etc.). Graded units will use the following grades:
HD
High Distinction
85 – 100%
D
Distinction
75 – 84%
Cr
Credit
65 – 74%
P
Pass
50 – 64%
F
Fail
0 – 49%
ACADEMIC HONESTY
Academic honesty is an integral part of the core values and principles contained in the Macquarie University Ethics Statement: http://www.mq.edu.au/ethics/ethic-statement-final.html.
Its fundamental principle is that all staff and students act with integrity in the creation, development, application and use of ideas and information. This means that:
? All academic work claimed as original is the work of the author making the claim.
? All academic collaborations are acknowledged.
? Academic work is not falsified in any way
? When the ideas of others are used, these ideas are acknowledged appropriately.
STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT
Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct: https://students.mq.edu.au/support/student_conduct/
POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central.
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Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:
Academic Honesty Policy: http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/academic_honesty/policy.html
Assessment Policy: http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/assessment/policy.html
Grading Policy: http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/grading/policy.html
Grade Appeal Policy: http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/gradeappeal/policy.html
Grievance Management Policy: http://mq.edu.au/policy/docs/grievance_management/policy.html
Disruption to Studies Policy (replaces the Special Consideration Policy): http://www.mq.edu.au/policy/docs/disruption_studies/policy.html
In addition, a number of other policies can be found in the Learning and Teaching Category of Policy Central.
STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES
Macquarie University provides a range of Student Support Services. Details of these services can be accessed at:
http://www.deanofstudents.mq.edu.au/ or http://www.campuslife.mq.edu.au/campuswellbeing
Another useful support service is provided by the Learning Skills unit, which you can find at: http://www.mq.edu.au/learningskills/. This service provides academic writing resources and study strategies.
Arts Student Centre
Phone:
+61 2 9850 6783
Email:
[email protected]
Office:
W6A/Foyer
Student Enquiry Service
For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at http://ask.mq.edu.au
Equity Support
Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.
IT Help
For help with University computer systems and technology, visit http://informatics.mq.edu.au/help/
When using the University’s IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use Policy. The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network, including students.
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GRADUATE CAPABILITIES
All academic programmes at Macquarie seek to develop graduate capabilities. These are:
COGNITIVE CAPABILITIES
1. Discipline Specific Knowledge and Skills
Our graduates will take with them the intellectual development, depth and breadth of knowledge, scholarly understanding, and specific subject content in their chosen fields to make them competent and confident in their subject or profession. They will be able to demonstrate, where relevant, professional technical competence and meet professional standards. They will be able to articulate the structure of knowledge of their discipline, be able to adapt discipline-specific knowledge to novel situations, and be able to contribute from their discipline to inter-disciplinary solutions to problems.
This graduate capability is supported by: Learning Outcome: 1. Define sustainability and the concept of sustainable development, and demonstrate a thorough understanding of philosophical principles and environmental ethics in sustainability. 2. Define and describe the main issues currently in play in sustainability debates, including examples at local, regional and global levels of interest. 3. Identify the main stakeholders in sustainability, and describe the roles of law, science and society in addressing sustainability issues. 4. Critically assess sustainability issues in multidisciplinary and pluralistic (multi-standpoint) perspectives in terms of general sustainability principles. 5. Demonstrate a general knowledge of legal concepts, systems and processes and institutions that regulate environmental values and sustainability practices. 6. Develop viable options for change in the law and other policy dimensions to improve sustainability outcomes, through in-depth legal analysis, creativity and problem solving skills. Assessment Task 1. Essay Plan 2. Quiz 3. Final Research Paper 4. Participation
2. Critical, Analytical and Integrative Thinking
We want our graduates to be capable of reasoning, questioning and analysing, and to integrate and synthesise learning and knowledge from a range of sources and environments; to be able to critique constraints, assumptions and limitations; to be able to think independently and systemically in relation to scholarly activity, in the workplace, and in the world. We want them to have a level of scientific and information technology literacy.
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This graduate capability is supported by: Learning Outcome 1. Define sustainability and the concept of sustainable development, and demonstrate a thorough understanding of philosophical principles and environmental ethics in sustainability. 2. Define and describe the main issues currently in play in sustainability debates, including examples at local, regional and global levels of interest. 3. Critically assess sustainability issues in multidisciplinary and pluralistic (multi-standpoint) perspectives in terms of general sustainability principles. 4. Develop viable options for change in the law and other policy dimensions to improve sustainability outcomes, through in-depth legal analysis, creativity and problem solving skills. Assessment Task 1. Essay Plan 2. Final Research Paper 3. Participation
3. Problem Solving and Research Capability
Our graduates should be capable of researching; of analysing, and interpreting and assessing data and information in various forms; of drawing connections across fields of knowledge; and they should be able to relate their knowledge to complex situations at work or in the world, in order to diagnose and solve problems. We want them to have the confidence to take the initiative in doing so, within an awareness of their own limitations.
This graduate capability is supported by: Learning Outcome 1. Define and describe the main issues currently in play in sustainability debates, including examples at local, regional and global levels of interest. 2. Identify the main stakeholders in sustainability, and describe the roles of law, science and society in addressing sustainability issues. Assessment Task 1. Essay Plan 2. Final Research Paper 3. Participation
4. Creative and Innovative
Our graduates will also be capable of creative thinking and of creating knowledge. They will be imaginative and open to experience and capable of innovation at work and in the community. We want them to be engaged in applying their critical, creative thinking.
This graduate capability is supported by: Learning Outcome 1. Define and describe the main issues currently in play in sustainability debates, including examples at local, regional and global levels of interest.
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2. Develop a practical law-reform project associated with a key sustainability issue. Assessment Task: 1. Final Research Paper 2. Participation
INTERPERSONAL OR SOCIAL CAPABILITIES
5. Effective Communication
We want to develop in our students the ability to communicate and convey their views in forms effective with different audiences. We want our graduates to take with them the capability to read, listen, question, gather and evaluate information resources in a variety of formats, assess, write clearly, speak effectively, and to use visual communication and communication technologies as appropriate.
This graduate capability is supported by: Learning Outcome 1. Define sustainability and the concept of sustainable development, and demonstrate a thorough understanding of philosophical principles and environmental ethics in sustainability. 2. Define and describe the main issues currently in play in sustainability debates, including examples at local, regional and global levels of interest. 3. Critically assess sustainability issues in multidisciplinary and pluralistic (multi-standpoint) perspectives in terms of general sustainability principles. 4. Assess established theoretical frameworks about current responses to sustainability issues, and communicate law reform and/or policy critiques effectively in written and verbal form. Assessment Task 1. Essay Plan 2. Final Research Paper 3. Participation
6. Engaged and Ethical Local and Global citizens
As local citizens our graduates will be aware of indigenous perspectives and of the nation’s historical context. They will be engaged with the challenges of contemporary society and with knowledge and ideas. We want our graduates to have respect for diversity, to be open-minded, sensitive to others and inclusive, and to be open to other cultures and perspectives: they should have a level of cultural literacy. Our graduates should be aware of disadvantage and social justice, and be willing to participate to help create a wiser and better society.
This graduate capability is supported by: Learning Outcome
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1. Define and describe the main issues currently in play in sustainability debates, including examples at local, regional and global levels of interest. 2. Identify the main stakeholders in sustainability, and describe the roles of law, science and society in addressing sustainability issues. 3. Critically assess sustainability issues in multidisciplinary and pluralistic (multi-standpoint) perspectives in terms of general sustainability principles. 4. Assess established theoretical frameworks about current responses to sustainability issues, and communicate law reform and/or policy critiques effectively in written and verbal form. 5. Develop a practical law-reform project associated with a key sustainability issue. Assessment Task 1. Essay Plan 2. Quiz 3. Final Research Paper
7. Socially and Environmentally Active and Responsible
We want our graduates to be aware of and have respect for self and others; to be able to work with others as a leader and a team player; to have a sense of connectedness with others and country; and to have a sense of mutual obligation. Our graduates should be informed and active participants in moving society towards sustainability.
This graduate capability is supported by: Learning Outcome 1. Define sustainability and the concept of sustainable development, and demonstrate a thorough understanding of philosophical principles and environmental ethics in sustainability. 2. Define and describe the main issues currently in play in sustainability debates, including examples at local, regional and global levels of interest. 3. Identify the main stakeholders in sustainability, and describe the roles of law, science and society in addressing sustainability issues. 4. Critically assess sustainability issues in multidisciplinary and pluralistic (multi-standpoint) perspectives in terms of general sustainability principles. 5. Assess established theoretical frameworks about current responses to sustainability issues, and communicate law reform and/or policy critiques effectively in written and verbal form. 6. Develop a practical law-reform project associated with a key sustainability issue. Assessment Task 1. Essay Plan 2. Final Research Paper
PERSONAL CAPABILITIES
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8. Capable of Professional and Personal Judgement and Initiative
We want our graduates to have emotional intelligence and sound interpersonal skills and to demonstrate discernment and common sense in their professional and personal judgement. They will exercise initiative as needed. They will be capable of risk assessment, and be able to handle ambiguity and complexity, enabling them to be adaptable in diverse and changing environments.
This graduate capability is supported by: Learning Outcome 1. Critically assess sustainability issues in multidisciplinary and pluralistic (multi-standpoint) perspectives in terms of general sustainability principles. 2. Develop a practical law-reform project associated with a key sustainability issue. Assessment Task 1. Essay Plan 2. Final Research Paper 3. Participation
9. Commitment to Continuous Learning
Our graduates will have enquiring minds and a literate curiosity which will lead them to pursue knowledge for its own sake. They will continue to pursue learning in their careers and as they participate in the world. They will be capable of reflecting on their experiences and relationships with others and the environment, learning from them, and growing – personally, professionally and socially.
This graduate capability is supported by: Learning Outcome 1. Define sustainability and the concept of sustainable development, and demonstrate a thorough understanding of philosophical principles and environmental ethics in sustainability. 2. Define and describe the main issues currently in play in sustainability debates, including examples at local, regional and global levels of interest. 3. Identify the main stakeholders in sustainability, and describe the roles of law, science and society in addressing sustainability issues. 4. Critically assess sustainability issues in multidisciplinary and pluralistic (multi-standpoint) perspectives in terms of general sustainability principles. 5. Assess established theoretical frameworks about current responses to sustainability issues, and communicate law reform and/or policy critiques effectively in written and verbal form. 6. Develop a practical law-reform project associated with a key sustainability issue. Assessment Task 1. Essay Plan 2. Quiz 3. Final Research Paper 4. Participation