Prepare an introduction for your informative speech using your approved topic

Unit VI Only this Question:

Introductions and Conclusions Actions for ‘Introductions and Conclusions’
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UNIT VI DISCUSSION WILL BE REPLACED BY TIMELY SUBMISSION OF YOUR INFORMATIVE SPEECH PREPARATION OUTLINE FIRST DRAFT. PLEASE SUBMIT THE FIRST DRAFT BY THURSDAY, JUNE 9TH TO RECEIVE CREDIT FOR THIS DISCUSSION FORUM.

Prepare an introduction for your informative speech using your approved topic. Be sure to (I) Gain the attention of the audience (II) Reveal the topic and relate it to the audience (III) Establish your credibility (IV) Preview the body of the speech. Then, prepare a conclusion. Be sure to let your audience know the speech is ending, to reinforce the central idea, and to make the conclusion vivid and memorable.

New material not required. Feedback will be provided by instructor within the discussion board so that the class can benefit from the comments.

Unit VII Question one:

Speaking Without Words Actions for ‘Speaking Without Words’
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Watch a 10-minute segment of a television drama with the sound turned off. What do the characters say with their dress, gestures, facial expressions, and the like? Do the same with a television comedy. How do the nonverbal messages in the two shows differ?

Be sure to provide us with the names of the programs you view.

Unit VII Question two:

Speech Analysis (Visual Aids) Actions for ‘Speech Analysis (Visual Aids)’
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View the Hidden World of Chili Peppers Speech or the Acupuncture Speech. Evaluate the speaker’s use of visual aids in light of the guidelines for preparing and presenting visual aids discussed in Chapter 14. Did the visual aids enhance the clarity, interest, and retainability of the speaker’s message?

New material not required.

Unit VIII Question one:

Persuasive Speech Analysis Actions for ‘Persuasive Speech Analysis’
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1. View the Putting the Brakes on Teenage Driving speech. Because this is a speech on a question of policy, pay special attention to how the speaker deals with the basic issues of need, plan, and practicality. Does the speaker present a convincing case that a serious problem exists? Does she offer a clear plan to solve the problem? Does she demonstrate that the plan is practical? Also, discuss the speaker’s credibility (ethos) and her use of sound reasoning and evidence (logos), and emotional appeal (pathos) for persuasiveness.

2. View the Implications of Social Networking and Text Messaging Speech. Is this an example of a Question of Fact, Value, or Policy speech? What organizational pattern is used for this speech? Discuss the speaker’s credibility (ethos) and his use of sound reasoning and evidence (logos), and emotional appeal (pathos) for persuasiveness.

New Material not required.

Unit VIII Question two:

Monroe’s Motivated Sequence Actions for ‘Monroe’s Motivated Sequence ‘
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Monroe’s Motivated Sequence (MMS) is tailor-made for policy speeches that seek immediate action. MMS is also used for the development of commercials and infomercials.

View the video example, which uses Monroe’s Motivated Sequence to persuade viewers to take action. Then, select an online commercial/infomercial that is organized according to MMS. Post a link to the commercial/infomercial and a brief analysis in which you (a) identify the target audience for the commercial and (b) describe each step in the motivated sequence as it appears in the commercial/infomercial.

You can find examples by doing an Internet search or a YouTube search. Do your best to choose an example a classmate has not already chosen.

Unit IX Only this question:

Vividness and Rhythm Actions for ‘Vividness and Rhythm’
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Effective speakers need to use language vividly and use rhythm to enhance the vividness of their discourse. The use of vivid language and rhythm is also important to writers and performers.

Consider some of your favorite songs, poems, books, or quotes from public speeches, TV, or movies, then post examples of at least three of the following stylistic devices: metaphor, simile, parallelism, repetition, alliteration, or antithesis. Make sure to attribute the lyrics or quote to the writer and/or speaker, singer, etc.

Examples:

“But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation.” –Martin Luther King, Jr. in his I Have a Dream speech. This is an example of repetition and metaphor.

“Do you ever feel like a plastic bag drifting through the wind, wanting to start again?” –Katy Perry in her song, Firework. This is an example of a simile.

Unit X Question one:

Commemorative Speech Analysis Actions for ‘Commemorative Speech Analysis’
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View the Elie Wiesel Commemorative Speech. Also, read the manuscript. Analyze the speech in light of the criteria for commemorative speaking presented in Chapter 18.

New material not required.

Elie Wiesel Speech Manuscript

Unit Question two:

Course Wrap-up Actions for ‘Course Wrap-up’
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What did you learn in this class that you will be able to apply to your life, personally and professionally?

New material not required.

Pat yourself on the back or raise a glass of your favorite beverage to celebrate completion of your last required discussion board post!

Unit Question three:

Advice for future COMM 2200 Hybrid Students Actions for ‘Advice for future COMM 2200 Hybrid Students’
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Please post some advice you think would be helpful to future students enrolled in a hybrid section of COMM 2200. Your words of wisdom will be shared anonomously next semester.