Project on Culture and Child Rearing Practices

Project on Culture and Child Rearing Practices

Order Description

Attached is the syllabus. Assignment 1 instruction are on page 15-16 & 43-48 Appendix A. Please follow the guideline in APA format. There’s numerous examples to

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Teacher Preparation Programs
Conceptual Framework
Nova Southeastern University provides:
S tandards-based instructional and leadership programs that link theory to practice with the
U se of data for evaluation, ethical decision-making, and intervention for the
N eeds and accommodations for diverse students who provide
R eflective and ethical practice based on meaningful field and clinical experiences as part of
I nnovative and convenient postsecondary delivery systems with a
S hared responsibility for quality education programs and professional advocacy with stakeholders with an
E mphasis on technology and best practices for dynamic learning environments
This conceptual framework is reflected in the following course syllabus:
Course number:
EC 620
Course title:
Research Issues in Child Development
Program name:
Early Childhood Education- Graduate
Content Area Faculty:
Wilma Robles de Meléndez, PhD and Elaine Van Lue, EdD
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Nova Southeastern University
Abraham S. Fischler School of Education
Graduate Teacher Education Program
Course Syllabus
“In every child who is born, under no matter what circumstances, and of
no matter what parents, the potentiality of the human race is born”
— J. Agee
I. COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE
EC 620 Research Issues in Child Development (3 credit hours)
II. INSTRUCTOR/FACULTY MEMBER
Note: If Candidates need to contact their Instructor prior to the beginning of the course, consult the course schedule at http://www.fischlerschool.nova.edu/current-students/course-schedule to find the name of the Instructor teaching this course. [Right click on the faculty member’s name in the schedule and choose “Properties” in the menu to obtain his/her email address.]
The Instructor will provide the Candidates with his/her contact information at the beginning of the course.
Candidates should contact their instructor for any questions regarding this course
PROFESSOR/CONTENT AREA FACULTY (Responsible for Syllabus):
Name: Wilma Robles de Meléndez, PhD
Address: 1750 NE 167th Street
North Miami Beach, FL 33162
Telephone: 1-800-986-3223, ext. 8644; 954-262-8644
E-mail: [email protected]
Name: Elaine Van Lue, EdD
Address: Orlando Campus
Millenia Blvd.
Orlando, FL
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Telephone: 1-800-986-3223, ext. 8644; 954-262-8644
E-mail: [email protected]
Students should contact their on-site instructor for any questions regarding this course.
Instructors are invited to contact the professor above for questions about this syllabus.
NOTE: To ensure program consistency, all sections of each course in the Graduate Teacher Education Program, regardless of delivery format, follow the same course requirements and content as listed in this syllabus that is provided by the Program Professor/Lead Faculty. The Instructor may add, but not delete, topics and activities based on best practices.
III. COURSE DESCRIPTION
EC 620 Research Issues in Child Development
This course provides an overview of the research process and of research issues related to each of the developmental areas (social-emotional, cognitive, language, physical). Students examine topics linked to the process of growth and development and to the education of children ages birth through eight. Appropriate field experiences are integrated. Prerequisites: None
IV. Course Student Learning Outcomes
Through this course candidates will:
1) Examine the theories explaining the developmental process.(Objectives 1, 2)
2) Discuss the role of families, societal and diversity factors in the child rearing and development process. (Objectives 2, 6, 7)
3) Explain the main tenets of developmental theories and research in early childhood. (Objectives 2, 3, 6)
4) Critically analyze ways to support children’s developmental needs through planned learning experiences. (Objectives 2, 5)
5) Apply developmental knowledge into the instructional process. (Objectives 3, 4, 7)
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V. COURSE OBJECTIVES
Through this course, students will:
1. Demonstrate knowledge of the major effects of genetics, health, nutrition, public policy, environment, and economics on child development.
2. Identify the sequence of development and the milestones (e.g., social-emotional, cognitive, language, physical) for the typically and atypically developing child.
3. Identify the elements of developmentally appropriate practices (DAP) for children with typical and atypical development (e.g., social-emotional, cognitive, language, physical).
4. Choose strategies for designing and implementing DAP instructional practices to support typically and atypically developing young children.
5. Identify the influences of substance abuse, physical abuse, and emotional distress on typical and atypical child development.
6. Recognize ways in which children’s early experiences, families, society, and culturally transmitted knowledge contribute to individual differences in development and learning.
7. Identify the influence of scientific research on theories of cognitive and social development, the principles of how children learn, and the development and implementation of instructional strategies.
8. Discuss the ethical implications of conducting developmental research with children and their families.
9. Examine the impact and influence of societal, cultural and diversity factors in the development process during the early childhood years.
10. Investigate and discuss issues related to the language acquisition process pertaining first and second language learners.
11. Explain the role of play and its benefits in the process of child development or all children (cognitive, social-emotional, and physical).
12. Review guidelines for the implementation of developmentally appropriate guidance and behavior strategies.
13. Discuss the prenatal, perinatal, postnatal factors (physical, social, environmental) that may place children at risk of a developmental disability or delay.
KEY:
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Standard Objective PreK/Primary Education Florida Subject area competency Preschool Education Florida Subject area competency NAEYC Florida Accomplished Practices InTASC ESOL
1
1.1
1.1
1a
a.1
1; 2
2
1.2
1.2
1b
a.2
1, 2
3
1.3
1.1, 1.2
1a, 1b
a.3
1, 4, 7,
4
1.4
6.2, 8.5
1a, 1c
a.3
1, 4
5
1.5
1.4
1a, 1b
a.1
1, 2, 7
6
1.6, 5.1, 5.2
4.2
1b, 2a
a.3
2
7
1.7
2.1, 1.1
1a, 4b, 6d
a.1
1, 2
8
3.3, 3.4
2.6, 3.4, 2.4,
6b
b.6 Ethics
9
9
1.6, 1.1
1.3, 4.3
1a, 1c
A1 Instructional design and planning
2
1.1a
10
1.5,1.2, 7.2
6.11, 6.12, 6.3, 4.2
1b, 5a, 5c
A1 Instructional design and planning
1, 4
2.1; 2.2; 2.3
11
1.2,1.4, 4.10, 4.11
6.8, 6.2
1a, 4b, 4c
A1 Instructional design and planning
1, 4, 5
12
1.1, 9.1, 9.2, 9.3 9.4
7.1, 7.2
1a, 4c
A2 Learning environment
3
13
1.1
1.4, 10.10, 10.8
1b, 1c
A2 Learning environment
1, 2
VI. REQUIRED MATERIALS
McDevitt, T. and Ormrod, J. (2013). Child Development and education. (5th edition). Boston, MA: Pearson.
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Bredekamp, S. and Copple, C. (2009). Developmentally appropriate practice in early childhood programs (3rd edition). Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children
National Association for the Education of Young Children. (2005). Responding to linguistic and cultural diversity. Recommendations for effective early childhood education. NAEYC Position statement. Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children. Author. (Available online at: http://www.naeyc.org)
National Association for the Education of Young Children. (2005). Code of ethical behavior and statement of commitment. Available online at: http://www.naeyc.org (See Position Statements)
Other required materials:
American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author
Recommended Readings:
Mills, G. (2000). Action research. A guide for the teacher researcher. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill. ISBN# 0-13-772047-5
NOTE ABOUT EMPHASIS ON DIVERSITY:
As described in the NSU Conceptual Framework (Needs and accommodations for diverse students), the following proficiencies for diversity are addressed in this course:
Nurture and support the needs of diverse students
o FEAP a.1 Quality of Instruction: Instructional Design and Lesson Planning, NSU g. Accommodations for ESOL Students and Students with Exceptional Learning Needs – Language development in instruction (Critical Task 1d)
o FEAP a.2 Quality of Instruction: The Learning Environment, b. Manages individual and class behaviors through a well-planned management system (Critical Task 2b)
o FEAP a.2 Quality of Instruction: The Learning Environment, d. Respects students’ cultural linguistic and family background (Critical Task 2b)
o FEAP a.2 Quality of Instruction: The Learning Environment; i. Utilizes current and emerging assistive technologies that enable students to participate in high-quality communication interactions and achieve their educational goals (Critical Task 2b)
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o FEAP a.3 Quality of Instruction: Instructional Delivery and Facilitation; NSU k. Use language tools to teach content to English language learners and develop language proficiency, through respect of skills and interests and value (Critical Task 3d)
Nurture and support diverse learning styles through varying strategies and assessments
o FEAP a.2 Quality of Instruction: The Learning Environment; h. Adapts the learning environment to accommodate the differing needs and diversity of students (Critical Task 2b)
o FEAP a.3 Quality of Instruction: Instructional Delivery and Facilitation; h. Differentiate instruction based on an assessment of student learning needs and recognition of individual differences in students (Critical Task 3c)
o FEAP a.4 Quality of Instruction: Assessment; d. Modifies assessments and testing conditions to accommodate learning styles and varying levels of knowledge (Critical Task 4c)
Nurture and support individual needs through varied activities
o FEAP a.2 Quality of Instruction: The Learning Environment; NSU j. Varies learning experiences for self-directed and collaborative learners (Critical Task 2b)
FEAP a.3 Quality of Instruction: Instructional Delivery and Facilitation; g. Apply varied instructional strategies and resources, including appropriate technology, to provide comprehensible instruction and to teach for student understanding (Critical Task 3b)
VII. CALENDAR OF WEEKLY REQUIREMENTS
Pre-Assignment:
Read and review Chapter 1 and Part 1 of Bredekamp and Copple.
Week Topics Assignments
1
Introduction to the course
– Learning about children
– What are the characteristics of children in our communities?
– What are the challenges that children face in our communities?
Readings:
McDevitt and Ormrod, Chapter 1; Bredekamp and Copple, part 1.
Discussion questions:
a. What traits characterize children in
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Week Topics Assignments
Definitions of child growth and development
-Typical and atypical development
Definition of concept “Developmentally Appropriate Practices” (DAP)
-What are the key parameters”
Relevance of the first three years of life on the process of child development
Current aspects and issues that impact development: Culture, diversity and technology: Implications for child development
Workshop session: Introduction to research
our communities?
b. What is child development? What is its scope?
c. Why is child development relevant to early childhood educators?
d. What is defined as “typical development”?
e. What factors or experiences may contribute to atypical developmental patterns?
f. How does developmental research inform early childhood practices?
Activities:
? Read and react to the case study in Chapter 1. Post your comments in the discussion board.
2
Early Childhood teachers as researchers
Research and child development
Research practices
Types of research studies
Definition of evidence-based practices
Teachers as researchers
– Using observational skills
Ethics in research about young children
Current research questions in child development:
? Focus on genetics and prenatal development: Research issues and findings
? Key milestones of the infancy and toddler years
Workshop session: Selecting a research topic
– How to establish the focus of what is to be investigated
Readings:
McDevitt and Ormrod, Chapters 2 and 3; Review and share comments about the Head Start child development framework: http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/hs/sr/approach/cdelf
Definition of culture due this week!
Discussion Questions:
a. What is the role of research in evidence-based practices? How does it influence early childhood practices?
b. Considering some of the topics in the current research agenda,
a. What is the role of culture in the developmental process?
b. What has been found about the influence of substance abuse, physical abuse and emotional distress on child development?
c. Why are observations relevant for early childhood educators? What characterizes good observations?
a. Review the observations guidelines from page 56. Carefully examine the
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Week Topics Assignments
photographs in pages 44 and 55. What would you say about each of the photos? What would be an objective observation?
Activities:
? Visit the American Psychological Association website and write a short commentary about their position on research with children: http://www.apa.org/ethics
d. Small group work: In your group, review and discuss each of the issues listed below:
Critical Issues in Early Childhood Education
1. Promoting Children’s Readiness to Learn
2. Meeting the Diverse Needs of Young Children (English language learners)
3. Organizing for Effective Early Childhood Programs and Practices
4. Assessing Young Children’s Progress Appropriately
5. Addressing the Literacy Needs of Emergent and Early Readers
(Source: North Central Regional Educational Lab (NCREL) (2001))
(a) Identify the underlying child development areas for each of the issues.
(b) Select the issue your group considers to be most critical. Based on the issue, write three research questions
3
Research Issue: Current Theoretical perspectives in child development
Developmental diversity and child development theories
Cross-cultural studies and child development
– What is culture?
Readings:
McDevitt and Ormrod , Chapters 3; and 15
Discussion Questions:
a. Identify and describe the developmental theory (or theories) that best define your early childhood education
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Week Topics Assignments
– How does culture influence development?
Role of culture in the process of development
– Influence of families in development during infancy, toddler and preschool years
– Culture and child- rearing practices
– Influence of families, culture and the environment in the infant, toddler and preschool years
– Cultural identity formation during the preschool and primary years.
Influence of media and peers on the developmental process
Workshop session: Development of research questions
beliefs and ideas. State the reason for your selection (s).
b. Reflective response: What are some of the ways in which culture and early experiences contribute to establishing individual differences on the developing child?
4
Research Issue: Promoting appropriate healthy and physical development
Nutrition and health issues
– Prenatal nutrition
– Nutrition and brain development during infancy, toddler and preschool years
– Appropriate nutrition during the primary years
– Cultural practices and health and nutrition ideas
Appropriate learning environments for children
– health and safety characteristics
– NAEYC expectations
– Local guidelines
Brain Research: Educational Implications
– Views on role of parents during the very early years (Infancy, toddler and preschool
Readings:
McDevitt and Ormrod, chapters 4 and 5; Bredekamp and Copple,
Assignment 1 due this session!
Discussion Questions
– :
a. What are the key findings about brain development during the first three years of life (infancy, toddler years)?
b. What are the implications of findings from brain development on early childhood education practices?
c. Watch the video “Environments: infancy” in My Education Lab. Based on the video, answer the following:
? What are the characteristics of a developmentally-
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Week Topics Assignments
years)
Workshop session:
Documentation and resources
based learning environment?
5
Research Issue: Recent directions in cognitive development
Theories on cognition
? Vygotsky’s and Piaget
? Factors that impact how children build concepts
Information processing and Gardner’s
Multiple intelligences theories
? Main points and implications of Gardner’s theory
Considerations about diversity and culture on cognition
Implications of the social and emotional domain on cognition
– How does it influence learning?
Workshop Session:
Finding sources to support the need for research (cont’d)
ReadMcDevitt and Ormrod, Chapters 6, 7, 8; Bredekamp and Copple
Discussion Questions:
a. What are the main precepts of Piaget and Vygotsky’s theories?
b. Watch the “Scaffolding” video on My Education Lab and describe the role of adults is supporting knowledge construction.
c. Choose a cognitive theory and describe what factors may impact a child’s construction of knowledge.
d. What are the main points of the Multiple Intelligences theory?
e. How does social and emotional development influence knowledge formation?
Activities:
? Discussion on case study on page 195. Identify the developmental implications.
6
Research Issue: Language development
Language development
o Stages of the language acquisition process (infancy, toddlerhood, preschool and primary years)
o Emergent literacy development: Key traits and common difficulties
o Second language learners: Developmental stages
Read, McDevitt and Ormrod Chapters 9-10-11
Assignment #2 due this week!
Discussion Questions:
a. What are the stages of language acquisition?
b. What elements influence language acquisition and development?
c. What aspects define the second language acquisition
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Week Topics Assignments
Social and emotional implications in language development
? Role of adults and caregivers in supporting language development
? Implications of positive attachment on the young learner
Role of the family in language acquisition
? Vigotsky’s concept of Zone of proximal development and language acquisition
? Second language learning (ESOL): Considerations about the role of the family and school in language learning
Workshop session
Data collection techniques
process?
Activities
a. Read and identify the key suggestions stated in the document Responding to linguistic and cultural diversity. Recommendations for effective early childhood education. NAEYC Position statement (http://www.naeyc.org)
7
Research Issue: Individual and social development
Theories on social and emotional development
Bowlby and Ainsworth’s theories about attachment:
– Implications of attachment in positive development
Social competence
Violence and aggression
Workshop session:
Development of a research implementation plan
Read: McDevitt and Ormrod, Chapter 11-14; Making friends. Assisting children’s early relationships (http://fpg.unc.edu/resources/snapshot-55)
Discussion Questions:
a. What are some of the key theories about social and emotional development?
b. What are the main tenets of Erikson’s theory? What are the implications for early education?
c. What is attachment?
d. What is social competence? What factors contribute to the development of social competence?
Activities
Watch the video on “Stranger anxiety” from My Education Lab- page 423. comment on its implications regarding attachment theories.
Conduct an Internet search and find current resources on violence prevention and the
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Week Topics Assignments
young child.
8
Research Issue: New Directions in child development
Societal challenges and child development
Moral development
– Supporting moral development during the early years
– Cultures, diversity and moral development
Fostering Prosocial development
– definition and skills
Supporting the needs of children with culturally and linguistically diverse characteristics
Actions to take to foster appropriate growth and development
Applications of child development principles in the instructional process
Course synthesis
Read McDevitt and Ornmrod, Chapter 14
Assignment 4 due this session!
The following are the critical issues identify by the National Center for Early Development & Learning
As you review them, identify those you consider to be apriority in your work setting:
1. What practices and policies can improve services for infants and toddlers?
2. How are America’s community agencies and public schools addressing the needs of 3- and 4-year-olds?
3. How can preschool and early elementary (K-2) practices maximize children’s success during the first years of school?
4. How can preschool and school practices be improved to meet the needs of children and families from ethnically diverse backgrounds?
5. How can we best deliver our research findings to parents, teachers, professionals, educators, policymakers, and administrators?
6. How can we recruit, prepare, support and keep a competent early childhood workforce?
Source: National Center for Early Development & Learning
VII. DESCRIPTION OF ASSIGNMENTS/RUBRICS
Reminder: If you have taken EDU 601 and will be taking EDU 602, you need to go to http://www.fischlerschool.nova.edu/gtep/portfolio and download the Individual Evidence Reflection Form (IERF) to complete and submit with any assignments that you might wish to use in your portfolio. Remember to keep all of your graded assignments for your portfolio! [You may choose to take EDU 620, instead of EDU 602.]
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Students starting in the Fall of 2012, will be taking EDU 600 and EDU 620 (instead of EDU 601 and 602) and will not be required to complete IERFs. Students who began their program prior to Fall 2012 may choose to take these new courses, or to complete the portfolio courses (EDU 601 and EDU 602).
Every assignment must include the FSEHS cover sheet/title page. Go to http://www.schoolofed.nova.edu/sso/PDF/fsehs_standard_format.pdf for directions and exceptions to the APA format. Complete and submit the Presubmission Checklist with each assignment. That form can be downloaded at: http://www.nova.edu/~yates/FSEHS_Pre_Submission_Checklist.pdf or http://www.nova.edu/~yates/FSEHS_Pre_Submission_Checklist.doc
Field Experiences:
This course includes field-based experiences. Students completing field experiences and field-based capstones must submit the demographic information about their site in the ASSESS system (http://fischlerschool.nova.edu/ASSESS). The directions for doing so are provided in the Appendix section of the syllabus.
? Security Clearance Needed for Field Experiences in All Courses ?
Nova Southeastern University requires candidates who need to fulfill a clinical or field experience, internship, practicum course requirement in an educational setting to complete the security clearance processes of the school, local school district, and state.
The requirement of a clinical experience may include a background check, drug testing, fingerprinting, etc. For information on these requirements, policies, and procedures, please refer to Obtaining Security Clearance (http://www.fischlerschool.nova.edu/gtep/Obtaining-Security-Clearance) at the Office of Placement Services (http://www.schoolofed.nova.edu/undergraduate/clinic/index.html).
Information on the Florida requirements for Background Screening Requirements is provided at http://www.fldoe.org/edstandards/background_screening.asp .
Additional information on ethical standards for teachers of Florida is provided online at the Office of Professional Practices (http://www.fldoe.org/edstandards/). Placements for Field Experience Course Requirements and for Applied Professional Experience, Field-Based Project, Reading Practicum, and Internship/Externship Capstone Courses
Requesting a Field Placement
If a field experience/field-based capstone is required and placement in a school is needed for this course, contact the Office of Placement Services at 954-262-7910 (1-800-986-3223, ext. 27910) to arrange your placement within a school in any given school district (and to get assistance with security clearance). Certain requirements must be met, and they
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vary from district to district. Further information is available at: http://www.schoolofed.nova.edu/gtep/field_experience/index.html
Important! Placements take time to coordinate. Contact this office as soon as possible.
Reporting Your Field Placement
Everyone completing a field experience or practicum is required to report their field experience location. Once you have completed your field experience, please access http://apps.fse.nova.edu/placementform/placementform.aspx to report your placement information.
Assignment #1 Project on Culture and Child Rearing Practices (Value 30%; Due: Session 4) (AP- Communication; Knowledge of Subject Matter, Human Development, Diversity) (InTASC –Content Knowledge of Subject Matter; Learning differences; Learner Development; ESOL: 2, 4, 5; NAEYC: #1 Child Development; #2 Building Family and Community Relationships, # 4a DAP Approaches to Connect with Families; Becoming a Professional; #7 Field Experiences) Course Objectives: 1, 4, 6, 8, 9
Note to Course Instructor: This course assignment has been designated as an NCATE Assessment for which we are collecting program data on the performance of the candidates. After reviewing this assignment, please link to the Assessment System at http://fischlerschool.nova.edu/assess.
Note to Candidate: This assignment includes a field experience which requires you to complete the Field experience demographical data. Follow the steps described in Appendix A to meet this requirement.
This activity is aimed at investigating the role of culture in child rearing practices. For this activity you will need to do the following:
1. Definition of culture and families interviews (NAEYC 2a, 2b, 1a, 1b, 4a, 6a, 6c, 7a, 7b)
a. Begin by reviewing the literature to define child rearing practices and to identify the role of culture in child rearing practices. (NAEYC 1a, 1b, 2a)
a. Reflecting on your own culture, identify child rearing activities and behaviors common to your own cultural group that you remember from childhood or that you follow with your own children.
b. Write a two-three page paper and provide a definition about the concepts culture and child rearing practices. Include documentation sources to support your definitions. Using examples from your own experiences, explain the influence of culture on the upbringing of children. (NAEYC 1a, 1b, 2a). Submit to your course instructor by week 2.
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b. Interviews with families (NAEYC 2a, 2b, 1a, 1b, 4a, 6a, 7a, 7b
? In consultation with your course instructor, select and interview three families preferably of different ethnic and cultural backgrounds and who have young children. One of the families should have a special needs child and, to the extent possible, also include a family expecting a child. (NAEYC 2a)
? Explain to the families the purpose of your interviews and schedule the interviews at a convenient time for them. Reassure them that confidentiality will be maintained about the findings from the interviews. Be sure to conduct yourself ethically as you complete your interviews. Find out about the following: (NAEYC 1a, 1b, 2a, 4a, 6a, 7a, 7b)
o Preparation for child birth; Traditions for welcoming children (describe any sociocultural, family based celebrations)
o Feeding routines and meals followed according to family, cultural traditions
o Designated primary caregivers
o Expectations about developmental milestones such as toileting, eating, behaviors, relationships with family members and adults, etc.
o Educational expectations for their children
o Gender-based expectations regarding behaviors, dress code, play activities, and others
o Any other relevant aspects gathered from your interviews
2. Observations of families and children ((NAEYC 1a, 1b, 2a; 6d, 7a, 7b)
a. Conduct a minimum of three observations of the families as they interact with their children. Use the form in the appendix to complete your observations. Identify the context of the interactions and note any cultural patterns during their interactions including use of language, way children are dressed, and nonverbal responses. Note interactions with any other family members or adults. (NAEYC 1a, 1b, 2a, 7a, 7b)
b. Review your observation notes and:
i. Identify the key aspects about the interactions observed. (What type of interactions occurred between the adult and child? What prompted the interactions? How would describe the tone of the interactions?)
ii. Prepare a summary with the highlights about practices and behaviors observed that depicted influence of culture. Include the summary of observations as an appendix. (NAEYC 1a, 1b, 6d)
iii. Consult with your course instructor and share your summary of observations. Make any changes as suggested.
3. Written report (NAEYC 1a, 1b, 2a, 6b, 6c, 6d)
c. Prepare a written report with your findings. Include in your report the following: (NAEYC 1a, 1b, 2a, 6b, 6c, 6d)
o Introduction- briefly describe the purpose of the project.
o Overview about culture and child rearing practices – Provide a definition of culture and how it influences child rearing practices- use three
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references to support your comments and to define its role in the process of development.
o Description of the families and children- provide a description of each of the families that were interviewed. Provide a statement describing how ethical guidelines were followed during the interviews.
o Findings from the interviews with the families/parents and comments from the observations– include a summary about the key findings from the interviews. Provide highlights about the observations regarding cultural expectations, practices and any other relevant aspect. Include the observation notes as an appendix.
o Reflections on the findings and observations – Provide a reflective commentary about the experience. (NAEYC 6a, 6d)
1. Indicate what you learned about culture and development and how it enhances your knowledge about factors that influence development;
2. Describe the implications about your findings on the of process planning and teaching practices.
3. Based on your findings, provide at least three recommendations to accommodate the children’s cultural characteristics in the teaching process.
o Prepare and include in your appendix a one-page summary about your key findings from the project to share in class. (NAEYC 6c, 6d).
Be sure to follow the APA guidelines to format your report.
Scoring rubric
Assignment Element
Not Met
Met
Exceeded
Part 1. Selection of Families and interviews (NAEYC 2a, 1a, 1b, 2a, 4a, 5b)
a. Definition of culture and child rearing practices with personal reflections (NAEYC 1a, 1b) (2 points)
Student provided an inadequate or omitted the definition about culture and child rearing practices. Student omitted or provided inadequate examples from own culture to explain influence of culture in the child rearing
Student provided a definition about culture and child rearing practices. Student includes examples from own culture to explain influence of culture in the child rearing process.
Student provided a detailed and well documented definition about culture and child rearing practices. Student includes examples from own culture to explain influence of culture in the child rearing process.
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Assignment Element
Not Met
Met
Exceeded
process.
b. Selection of families for Interviews (NAEYC 2a) (1 points)
Student did not select three families or families were selected without consulting with the instructor.
Student selected three families to conduct interviews in consultation with the course instructor. Most families respond to the criteria stated in the activity.
Student selected three families to conduct interviews in consultation with the course instructor. Families respond to the criteria stated in the activity.
b.1 Consultation with course instructor (1 point)
Families were selected without consulting with the instructor.
The candidate consulted with the course instructor about the selection of some of the families.
The candidate selected three families to conduct interviews in consultation with the course instructor.
c. Family interviews (NAEYC 1a, 1b, 2a) (2 points)
Student did not conduct interviews of three families with different ethnic characteristics or conducted interviews with less than three families who did not meet the criteria.
Student conducted interviews of three families with different ethnic characteristics. Most families respond to the criteria stated in the activity.
Student conducted interviews of three families with different ethnic characteristics. Families respond to the criteria stated in the activity.
c. 1. Developmental data from Family interviews (NAEYC 1a, 1b) (2 points)
The candidate did not provide data about children’s developmental and individual needs and characteristics gathered through the interviews.
Data about children’s developmental and individual needs and characteristics was gathered through the interviews.
Data about children’s developmental and individual needs and characteristics was gathered through the interviews and presented in a detailed way.
Part 2: Observations of families and children ((NAEYC 1a, 1b, 2a)
a. Observations of
Student did not
Student conducted
Student conducted
EC 620 Page 19 of 66 Revised May 2015
Assignment Element
Not Met
Met
Exceeded
family interactions (NAEYC 1a, 1b, 2a) (3 points)
conduct observations or conducted less than three interviews about the families’ interactions with their children.
observations about the families’ interactions with their children. Most families respond to the criteria stated in the activity.
observations about the families’ interactions with their children. All the elements of the criteria were covered during the interviews.
b. Review and analysis of observations (NAEYC 1a, 1b) ( 3 points)
Student conducted an inadequate or no review and analysis of the information collected during the observations. A summary of the key aspects was incomplete or missing.
Student conducted a review and analysis of the information collected during the observations. A summary of the key aspects was prepared.
Student conducted a detailed review and analysis of the information collected during the observations. A summary of the key aspects was prepared.
Part 3: Written report (NAEYC 1a, 1b, 2a, 5b, 5c, 5d)
a. Written report about the observations and interviews. (NAEYC 1a, 1b, 2a, 5b, 5c, 5d) (8 points)
The student did not submit of submitted an insufficient report about the observations and interviews.
The student prepared a report about the observations and interviews. The report included the required elements.
The student prepared a detailed and rich report about the observations and interviews. The report includes the following:
o Introduction
o Definition of culture and how it influences child rearing practices supported with references
o Description of the families and children
o Findings from the interviews with the parents
o Comments from the observations
EC 620 Page 20 of 66 Revised May 2015
Assignment Element
Not Met
Met
Exceeded
of children and families
b. Reflective commentary on the findings and observations (NAEYC 5a, 5c, 5d) (3 points)
The student provided an inadequate or no reflective commentary on how the concepts learned about culture and development impact teaching and learning practices.
The student provided a reflective commentary on how the concepts learned about culture and development impact teaching and learning practices.
The student provided a detailed reflective commentary on how the concepts learned about culture and development impact teaching and learning practices.
b.1- Reflective commentary on identification with Early Childhood Field NAEYC 5a) (2 points)
The candidate did not include a reflective commentary on the findings and observations.
The candidate provided some comments on how the concepts learned about culture and development through the interview facilitated their identification with the early childhood field.
The candidate provided a detailed reflective commentary on how the concepts learned about culture and development through the interview facilitated their identification with the early childhood field.
c. Summary about findings (NAEYC 5a, 5c, 5d) (2 points)
An insufficient or no summary about findings was provided on the implications of culture on the process of development.
The student summarized the findings and provided a one-page summary on the implications of culture on the process of development.
The student effectively summarized the findings and provided a one-page summary on the implications of culture on the process of development.
Demographical data for field experience (1 point)
Candidate did not complete or provided detailed the demographical data
Candidate carefully completed and provided demographical data about the field experience
Candidate carefully completed and provided detailed demographical data
Total: 30 points
EC 620 Page 21 of 66 Revised May 2015
Assignment #2 Presentation on Role of Play and Emergent Literacy Development:
(15 points, Session 6) (NAEYC #1 Child Development; #4 DAP Approaches; #6 Becoming a Professional; #7 Field Experiences) Course Objectives 1, 4, 11
(AP- a.3Effective Delivery of Instruction) (InTASC- Learner development, Instructional Strategies); Course Objectives: 3, 4, 7
The purpose of this activity is to prepare a class presentation on the role of play in language development (emergent literacy) during the birth-age 8 years.
In this activity you will be part of a two-member team. In your group, you will examine the literature on play and emergent literacy. Identify current research on the topic and findings on classroom best practices. Your team will need to do the following:
? Topic: select a topic related to play and emergent literacy. Provide a description about the developmental age group that the topic will address.
? Rationale: Provide a rationale to support the relevance of the topic. Be sure to include arguments to support the need for play as a factor influencing language and emergent literacy from the perspective of classroom practices. Support your position with a minimum of two references. References should include recent research studies on language and literacy development. Select a developmental theory to frame your focus.
? Observations: Each group member will conduct observations of children at two classrooms and note their play behaviors. Identify literacy activities and behaviors displayed by children. Use the form in the appendix to complete your observations:
? Review of the literature: Each member will find at least four articles related to the topic selected by the group. Look for articles written within the last five years.
o Read each reference and answer the following questions:
? What aspects about the issue are discussed or addressed in the article?
? Describe the subjects and the setting.
? What evidence and/or theoretical explanations are provided as relevant to the issue?
? What new aspects or ideas about the issue did you learn through the article?
? What are the implications for classroom practice and early childhood services?
? Report and presentation: Group members will prepare a class presentation using PowerPoint. Submit a written report of your findings. Include the following in the report:
o Description and rationale about the topic
o Review of the literature about the topic
o Comments from observations
o Conclusion
o Reflection
Rubric:
EC 620 Page 22 of 66 Revised May 2015
Element
Points
Points obtained
1. Topic selection is appropriate and focuses relationship between play and literacy development. (1 points)
1
2. A detailed rationale is provided about the topic. A developmental theory was clearly selected to frame the rationale and as a focus for the topic. (2 points)
2
3. Students conducted observations of children in two different classrooms. Data was collected using the observation form that was provided. (2 points)
2
4. A review of the literature on the topic was provided and included a minimum of four current references. (2 points)
2
5. Presentation using technology is prepared and presented
1
6. Conclusion statement is included describing the relevance of the topic. (2 points)
2
7. Reflections on the findings from the observations and the review of the literature were provided. (3 points)
2
8. Written report was submitted and includes all the preceding elements. Report adheres to APA guidelines (2 points)
2
9. Presentation was completed using multimedia. (1 points)
1
Total:
15 points
Assignment #3 Key Assessment for Accomplished Practice a.3: Quality of Instruction – Developmentally-based Instructional Delivery and Facilitation (Due: Week 7, Value 30 points) Course Objectives: 4, 7, 9, 12
Note to Course Instructor:
This course assignment has been designated as an Accomplished Practice Assessment for which
we are collecting program data on the performance of the candidate. After reviewing this
assignment, please link to the Assessment System at http://fischlerschool.nova.edu/assess. You
will log in with your NSU login name (e.g., in the e-mail address [email protected], smith is the
login name) and NSU password. Please enter the evaluation results on the specified criteria
EC 620 Page 23 of 66 Revised May 2015
(bolded areas of the rubric) for each candidate’s assignment online.
This purpose of this assignment is to apply child development principles into the planning process. Your task is to identify an age group and to design and implement a lesson plan to address the children’s developmental needs. You will also record the lesson and self-critique your implementation of the lesson. This assignment has three sections. Read each one carefully:
Part 1: Selection of sample and lesson plan
a. Select a sample of a minimum three children (ages 2-5) and create a literacy-focused lesson plan that will meet the needs of the target age group.
b. Identify the target goals and objectives for your lesson plan. Be sure to select areas appropriate to the age group that you selected.
c. Design activities based on the developmental needs and characteristics of the children.
a. Identify modifications to meet the children’s needs including those with special needs and culturally and linguistically diverse
d. Describe how you will address the children’s developmental social and emotional needs through the lesson plan
Part 2: Implementation
e. Implement your lesson plan with a small group of children and reflect on the children’s reactions and outcomes
f. Make arrangements to record the lesson either through video, audio recording or through photographs
(Note: If you do not have access to video equipment, please consult with your professor to determine whether video equipment is available for student use, or if an audio recording, pictures, would be acceptable).
Part 3: Critique and Report
g. After implementing the session, review and critique the lesson. Include the following in your report:
1. A brief summary of the lesson and evidence on how it was a developmentally appropriate engaging lesson (FEAP a.3.a/InTASC 8)
2. The content area literacy strategies applied to deepen the children’s understanding (FEAP a.3.b/InTASC 4b.p, 4d.p, 5b.p)
3. Description of evidence showing gaps in children’s subject matter knowledge (e.g., how you identified what they learned or that still need to learn) (FEAP a.3.c/InTASC 6c.p, 6g.p, 6l.k)
4. How you modified instruction to respond to children’s interests and levels related to the lesson targeted skills and concepts and children with special needs (FEAP a.3.d/InTASC 4e.p, 4k.k, 4p.d, 9i.k; ESE Curriculum)
EC 620 Page 24 of 66 Revised May 2015
5. How you related and integrated the subject matter with other subject areas and children’s experiences 6. How you included and used of higher-order questioning techniques (FEAP a.3.f/InTASC 4c.p, 4j.k, 5d.p, 5m.k, 8f.p, 8k.p, 8j.k)
7. How you involved all learners in generating, or evaluating, new ideas and ways to solve problems (NSU a.3.l, InTASC 5f.p)
8. How you applied different instructional strategies and resources (including technology) and also varied your role (e.g., instructor, facilitator, coach, audience) in the instructional presentation including appropriate technology, to provide comprehensible learning experiences (FEAP a.3.g/InTASC 2b.p, 2g.k, 4a.p, 4f.p, 4g.p, 5c.p, 8d.p, 8n.k)
9. How you provided opportunities for all children including children with special needs to demonstrate their knowledge through a variety of products or performances (NSU a.3.m, InTASC 8e.p; ESE Curriculum)
10. How you differentiated instruction based on an assessment of children’s learning needs and recognition of individual differences in children including children with special needs and children with language differences (English language learners and children with linguistic needs (FEAP a.3.h/InTASC 2h.k, 2l.d, 8a.p, 8k.k, 8l.k, 8s.d) (ESOL 3.2) (ESE Competency 3)
11. How you supported, encouraged, and provided immediate and specific feedback to children to promote achievement, based on age-appropriate standards-based instruction (e.g., Common Core Standards) (FEAP a.3.i/InTASC 6d.p, 6n.k, 6s.d)
12. How you used children’s feedback to monitor instructional needs and to adjust instruction (FEAP a.3.j/InTASC 6e.p, 6m.k, 6q.d)
13. How you used language tools to teach content to English language learners and help them to develop language proficiency, while respecting the children’s level of skills and interests and helping them to feel valued through the learning process (NSU a.3.k, InTASC 2e.p, 2i.k, 2m.d, 2n.d, 2o.d) (ESOL 4.1, 5.2)
EC 620 Page 25 of 66 Revised May 2015
Grading Rubric
Assignment 3 in EC 620 supports the pre-professional development of
? Accomplished Practice a.3 – Quality of Instruction – Instructional Delivery and Facilitation
? Portions of InTASC Model Core Teaching Standards 2: Learning Differences; 4: Content Knowledge; 5: Application of Content; 6: Assessment; 8: Instructional Strategies, and 9: Professional Learning and Ethical Practice
? NCATE Standards 1b. Pedagogical Content Knowledge for Teacher Candidates and 1c. Professional and Pedagogical Knowledge and Skills for Teacher Candidates ? NAEYC Standards 1 Child development- Using developmental knowledge to create healthy, respectful, supportive and challenging learning environments; 4Using a repertoire of developmentally Appropriate teaching learning approaches; 5 Understanding Content Knowledge ? Florida Subject Matter Competency: Prekindergarten/Primary- 1 Knowledge of child development; Preschool- 1 Knowledge of child development
? ESOL 3.2, 4.1, 5.2
? ESE Competency 3
3. Instructional Delivery and Facilitation. The effective educator consistently utilizes a deep and comprehensive knowledge of the subject taught to:
Not Met
Met
Exceeded
Deliver engaging and challenging lessons session/presentation. (FEAP a.3.a/InTASC 8)
(2 points)
Little or no evidence is provided that the candidate delivers engaging and challenging lessons. Little or no evidence of student/ participant or colleague feedback (e.g., oral feedback/ interaction of students/participants, survey, written statement, etc.) is provided that states that the lessons/ therapy session/ presentation was engaging or challenging.
Based on submitted evidence of student/ participant or colleague feedback (e.g., oral feedback/ interaction of students/ participants, survey, video, written statement, etc.), the candidate delivers engaging and challenging lessons/ therapy session/ presentation, that states that the lessons/therapy session/ presentation was engaging or challenging.
Based on multiple pieces of submitted evidence of student/participant or colleague feedback (e.g., oral feedback/interaction of students/participants, survey, video, written statement, etc.), the candidate delivers engaging and challenging lessons/therapy session/ presentation, that states that the lessons/therapy session/presentation was engaging or challenging.
Deepen and enrich students’ understanding through content area literacy strategies, verbalization of thought, and application of the subject matter. (FEAP a.3.b
/InTASC 4b.p, 4d.p, 5b.p)
(2 points)
Little or no evidence was provided that the candidate can deepen and enrich students’/ participants’ understanding through content area literacy strategies, verbalization of thought, and application of the subject matter. No description, objective, or assessment information is provided of content area literacy strategy infusion into the course/situation. (In addition for clinical observations: No evidence
The candidate deepens and enriches students’/ participants’ understanding through content area literacy strategies, verbalization of thought, and application of the subject matter. The candidate provides evidence that instructional objectives and assessments are linked to the content area literacy strategies. (In addition for clinical observations: Examples of student work show that subject matter content is applied.)
The candidate deepens and enriches students’/ participants’ understanding through content area literacy strategies, verbalization of thought, and application of the subject matter. The candidate provides evidence that instructional objectives and assessments are linked to the content area literacy strategies. (In addition for clinical observations: Examples of student work show that subject matter content is
EC 620 Page 26 of 66 Revised May 2015
Assignment 3 in EC 620 supports the pre-professional development of
? Accomplished Practice a.3 – Quality of Instruction – Instructional Delivery and Facilitation
? Portions of InTASC Model Core Teaching Standards 2: Learning Differences; 4: Content Knowledge; 5: Application of Content; 6: Assessment; 8: Instructional Strategies, and 9: Professional Learning and Ethical Practice
? NCATE Standards 1b. Pedagogical Content Knowledge for Teacher Candidates and 1c. Professional and Pedagogical Knowledge and Skills for Teacher Candidates ? NAEYC Standards 1 Child development- Using developmental knowledge to create healthy, respectful, supportive and challenging learning environments; 4Using a repertoire of developmentally Appropriate teaching learning approaches; 5 Understanding Content Knowledge ? Florida Subject Matter Competency: Prekindergarten/Primary- 1 Knowledge of child development; Preschool- 1 Knowledge of child development
? ESOL 3.2, 4.1, 5.2
? ESE Competency 3
3. Instructional Delivery and Facilitation. The effective educator consistently utilizes a deep and comprehensive knowledge of the subject taught to:
Not Met
Met
Exceeded
was provided that students applied subject matter content.)
applied. An evaluation of the use of content area literacy strategies, verbalization of thought, and application of the subject matter is provide that includes a statement of how these can be enhanced in future instruction.)
Identify gaps in students’/participants’ subject matter knowledge. (FEAP a.3.c/InTASC 6c.p, 6g.p, 6l.k) (2 points)
Little or no evidence is provided that the candidate can identify gaps in students’/ participants’ subject matter knowledge; The candidate can identify gaps in students’/ participants’ subject matter knowledge. Evidence is provided in the form of an assessment for which data have been collected and analyzed (e.g., classroom assessment or standardized test data). The candidate provides multiple sources of evidence that show gaps in students’/participants’ subject matter knowledge. The evidence is provided in the form of a data analysis and a plan for remediation for the student/participant.
Modify lesson presentation to respond to preconceptions or misconceptions. (FEAP a.3.d/InTASC 4e.p, 4k.k, 4p.d, 9i.k) (2 points)
Little or no evidence is provided that the candidate can modify lessons/therapy sessions/presentations to respond to preconceptions or misconceptions. The candidate can modify lessons/therapy sessions/presentations to respond to student preconceptions or misconceptions. Evidence is provided in the form of examples and strategies that were used to respond to the student/ participant. The candidate provides examples of occurrences of student preconceptions or misconceptions that have been reviewed with colleagues. The candidate demonstrates that these preconceptions or misconceptions are routinely anticipated and that the lesson session/presentation is developed to provide examples and non-examples that will resolve
EC 620 Page 27 of 66 Revised May 2015
Assignment 3 in EC 620 supports the pre-professional development of
? Accomplished Practice a.3 – Quality of Instruction – Instructional Delivery and Facilitation
? Portions of InTASC Model Core Teaching Standards 2: Learning Differences; 4: Content Knowledge; 5: Application of Content; 6: Assessment; 8: Instructional Strategies, and 9: Professional Learning and Ethical Practice
? NCATE Standards 1b. Pedagogical Content Knowledge for Teacher Candidates and 1c. Professional and Pedagogical Knowledge and Skills for Teacher Candidates ? NAEYC Standards 1 Child development- Using developmental knowledge to create healthy, respectful, supportive and challenging learning environments; 4Using a repertoire of developmentally Appropriate teaching learning approaches; 5 Understanding Content Knowledge ? Florida Subject Matter Competency: Prekindergarten/Primary- 1 Knowledge of child development; Preschool- 1 Knowledge of child development
? ESOL 3.2, 4.1, 5.2
? ESE Competency 3
3. Instructional Delivery and Facilitation. The effective educator consistently utilizes a deep and comprehensive knowledge of the subject taught to:
Not Met
Met
Exceeded these in the initial lesson/ therapy session/ presentation.
Relate and integrate the subject matter with other disciplines and life experiences. (FEAP a.3.e/InTASC 5a.p, 5h.p, 5i.k, 5j.k, 5r.d)
(2 points)
Little or no evidence is provided that the candidate can relate and integrate the subject matter with other disciplines and life experiences. There are no examples provided that address subject matter in other disciplines or life experiences.
The candidate can relate and integrate the subject matter with other disciplines and life experiences. There are no examples provided that address subject matter in other disciplines or life experiences. At least three examples are provided that ask students to relate the subject matter to that in other disciplines and with life experiences.
The candidate can relate and integrate the subject matter with other disciplines and life experiences. There are no examples provided that address subject matter in other disciplines or life experiences. More than three examples are provided that ask students/ participants to relate the subject matter to that in other disciplines and with life experiences. In addition, the candidate provides examples of students’/participants’ describing, in verbal or written communication, how the subject matter relates to other disciplines and life experiences.
Employ higher-order questioning techniques. (FEAP a.3.f/InTASC 4c.p, 4j.k, 5d.p, 5m.k, 8f.p, 8k.p, 8j.k)
(3 points)
Little or no evidence is provided that the candidate can implement higher-order questioning techniques in the educational/clinical/ presentation setting.
The candidate can implement higher-order questioning techniques in the educational/clinical/ presentation setting as demonstrated by examples of questions that are used with students/participants.
The candidate can implement higher-order questioning techniques in the educational/clinical/ presentation setting as demonstrated by examples of questions and activities that are designed to
EC 620 Page 28 of 66 Revised May 2015
Assignment 3 in EC 620 supports the pre-professional development of
? Accomplished Practice a.3 – Quality of Instruction – Instructional Delivery and Facilitation
? Portions of InTASC Model Core Teaching Standards 2: Learning Differences; 4: Content Knowledge; 5: Application of Content; 6: Assessment; 8: Instructional Strategies, and 9: Professional Learning and Ethical Practice
? NCATE Standards 1b. Pedagogical Content Knowledge for Teacher Candidates and 1c. Professional and Pedagogical Knowledge and Skills for Teacher Candidates ? NAEYC Standards 1 Child development- Using developmental knowledge to create healthy, respectful, supportive and challenging learning environments; 4Using a repertoire of developmentally Appropriate teaching learning approaches; 5 Understanding Content Knowledge ? Florida Subject Matter Competency: Prekindergarten/Primary- 1 Knowledge of child development; Preschool- 1 Knowledge of child development
? ESOL 3.2, 4.1, 5.2
? ESE Competency 3
3. Instructional Delivery and Facilitation. The effective educator consistently utilizes a deep and comprehensive knowledge of the subject taught to:
Not Met
Met
Exceeded
challenge students/ participants to respond in a way that verifies that the student/participant has learned the content and can apply the content in class discussions, written educational/clinical/ presentation setting, etc. The candidate provides examples of student/ participant work that demonstrates this understanding.
Involve learners in generating, or evaluating, new ideas and ways to solve problems. (NSU a.3.l, InTASC 5f.p) (2 points)
Little or no evidence is provided that the candidate involved learners in generating or evaluating new ideas and ways to solve problems.
The candidate provides evidence of involving learners in generating or evaluating new ideas and ways to solve problems in the content area.
The candidate provides evidence that learners are routinely involved in generating or evaluating new ideas and ways to solve problems in the content area. Evidence of these activities is provided in student work examples or summaries of student conversations.
Apply varied instructional strategies and resources, including appropriate technology, to provide comprehensible lessons, and to teach for student understanding. (FEAP a.3.g/InTASC 2b.p, 2g.k, 4a.p, 4f.p, 4g.p, 5c.p,
Little or no evidence is provided that the candidate can use a variety of instructional/ therapeutic/presentation strategies and resources, including instructional technology, to teach/provide therapy/
The candidate provides evidence of using at least three instructional/ therapeutic/presentation strategies and resources, including instructional technologies that were used to teach for understanding. The candidate explains how
The candidate provides evidence of using more than three instructional/therapeutic/ presentation strategies and more than three instructional resources, including instructional technology, that were used
EC 620 Page 29 of 66 Revised May 2015
Assignment 3 in EC 620 supports the pre-professional development of
? Accomplished Practice a.3 – Quality of Instruction – Instructional Delivery and Facilitation
? Portions of InTASC Model Core Teaching Standards 2: Learning Differences; 4: Content Knowledge; 5: Application of Content; 6: Assessment; 8: Instructional Strategies, and 9: Professional Learning and Ethical Practice
? NCATE Standards 1b. Pedagogical Content Knowledge for Teacher Candidates and 1c. Professional and Pedagogical Knowledge and Skills for Teacher Candidates ? NAEYC Standards 1 Child development- Using developmental knowledge to create healthy, respectful, supportive and challenging learning environments; 4Using a repertoire of developmentally Appropriate teaching learning approaches; 5 Understanding Content Knowledge ? Florida Subject Matter Competency: Prekindergarten/Primary- 1 Knowledge of child development; Preschool- 1 Knowledge of child development
? ESOL 3.2, 4.1, 5.2
? ESE Competency 3
3. Instructional Delivery and Facilitation. The effective educator consistently utilizes a deep and comprehensive knowledge of the subject taught to:
Not Met
Met
Exceeded
8d.p, 8n.k) (ESE Competency 3) (2 points)
present for student/ participant understanding.
each strategy or resource was used to meet a specific instructional/therapeutic/ presentation need.
to teach for student/ participant understanding. The candidate explains how each strategy or resource was used to meet a specific instructional/therapeutic/ presentation need.
Provide opportunities for students to demonstrate knowledge through a variety of products or performances. (NSU a.3.m, InTASC 8e.p)
(2 points)
Little or no evidence is provided that the candidate provided opportunities for students to demonstrate knowledge through a variety of products or performances.
The candidate provides opportunities for students to demonstrate knowledge through a variety of products or performances.
The candidate provides opportunities for students to demonstrate knowledge through a variety of products and performances.
Differentiate lesson
presentations based on an assessment of student/ participant learning needs and recognition of individual differences in students/participants; (FEAP a.3.h/InTASC 2h.k, 2l.d, 8a.p, 8k.k, 8s.d) (ESE Competency 2) (3 points)
Little or no evidence is provided that the candidate can differentiate lessons/therapy session/presentations based on assessment of student/participant learning needs. Little or no evidence is provided that the candidate recognizes individual differences in students/ participants.
The candidate differentiates lessons/therapy session/presentations based on assessment of student/ participant learning needs. The candidate provides evidence of assessment for the class and describes how the assessment data point to the need for differentiated lessons/therapy session/ presentations that meets the individual differences in students/participants.
The candidate differentiates lessons/ therapy session/ presentations based on assessment of student/ participant learning needs. Evidence of assessment for the class/group is provided. The resulting assessment data are charted and presented in a graphical format. The candidate provides information on how lessons/therapy session/presentations will be differentiated for one student/participant.
EC 620 Page 30 of 66 Revised May 2015
Assignment 3 in EC 620 supports the pre-professional development of
? Accomplished Practice a.3 – Quality of Instruction – Instructional Delivery and Facilitation
? Portions of InTASC Model Core Teaching Standards 2: Learning Differences; 4: Content Knowledge; 5: Application of Content; 6: Assessment; 8: Instructional Strategies, and 9: Professional Learning and Ethical Practice
? NCATE Standards 1b. Pedagogical Content Knowledge for Teacher Candidates and 1c. Professional and Pedagogical Knowledge and Skills for Teacher Candidates ? NAEYC Standards 1 Child development- Using developmental knowledge to create healthy, respectful, supportive and challenging learning environments; 4Using a repertoire of developmentally Appropriate teaching learning approaches; 5 Understanding Content Knowledge ? Florida Subject Matter Competency: Prekindergarten/Primary- 1 Knowledge of child development; Preschool- 1 Knowledge of child development
? ESOL 3.2, 4.1, 5.2
? ESE Competency 3
3. Instructional Delivery and Facilitation. The effective educator consistently utilizes a deep and comprehensive knowledge of the subject taught to:
Not Met
Met
Exceeded
Support, encourage, and ; provide immediate and specific feedback to students/participants to promote student/participant achievement. (FEAP a.3.i/InTASC 6d.p, 6n.k, 6s.d) (2 points)
Little or no evidence is provided that the candidate uses knowledge of subject matter to support, encourage, and provide immediate and specific feedback to students/participants to promote student/ participant achievement.
The candidate provides evidence of how the knowledge of subject matter is used to support, encourage, and provide immediate and specific feedback to students/ participants to promote student/participant achievement. These examples are based on standards-based instruction/ therapy/presentation in the content area.
The candidate provides multiple examples of how the knowledge of subject matter is used to support, encourage, and provide immediate and specific feedback to students/ participants to promote student/participant achievement. These examples are based on standards-based instruction/therapy/ presentation in the content area.
Utilize student/participant feedback to monitor instruction//presentation needs and to adjust instruction/presentation. (FEAP a.3.j/InTASC 6e.p, 6m.k, 6q.d) (3 points)
Little or no evidence is provided that the candidate can use student/participant feedback to monitor instruction/therapy /presentation needs and adjust instruction/therapy/ presentation.
The candidate provides evidence of how student/participant feedback was used to monitor instruction/therapy/ presentation needs. Evidence is also provided that demonstrates that the candidate can apply student/participant feedback to adjust instruction/therapy/ presentation that meets the students’/participants’ needs.
The candidate provides multiple examples of evidence of how student/participant feedback was used to monitor instruction presentation needs. Evidence is also provided for multiple instances that demonstrate the candidate’s ability to apply student/participant feedback to adjust instruction presentation that meets the student/participant needs.
EC 620 Page 31 of 66 Revised May 2015
Assignment 3 in EC 620 supports the pre-professional development of
? Accomplished Practice a.3 – Quality of Instruction – Instructional Delivery and Facilitation
? Portions of InTASC Model Core Teaching Standards 2: Learning Differences; 4: Content Knowledge; 5: Application of Content; 6: Assessment; 8: Instructional Strategies, and 9: Professional Learning and Ethical Practice
? NCATE Standards 1b. Pedagogical Content Knowledge for Teacher Candidates and 1c. Professional and Pedagogical Knowledge and Skills for Teacher Candidates ? NAEYC Standards 1 Child development- Using developmental knowledge to create healthy, respectful, supportive and challenging learning environments; 4Using a repertoire of developmentally Appropriate teaching learning approaches; 5 Understanding Content Knowledge ? Florida Subject Matter Competency: Prekindergarten/Primary- 1 Knowledge of child development; Preschool- 1 Knowledge of child development
? ESOL 3.2, 4.1, 5.2
? ESE Competency 3
3. Instructional Delivery and Facilitation. The effective educator consistently utilizes a deep and comprehensive knowledge of the subject taught to:
Not Met
Met
Exceeded
Use language tools to teach content to English language learners and develop language proficiency, through respect of skills and interests and value. (NSU a.3.k, InTASC 2e.p, 2i.k, 2m.d, 2n.d, 2o.d) (3 points
Little or no evidence is provided that the candidate can use language tools to teach content to English language learners and develop language proficiency, through respect of skills and interests and value of the individual.
The candidate provides examples of using language tools to teach content to English language learners and develop language proficiency, through respect of skills and interests, while demonstrating value of the individual.
The candidate provides multiple examples of using language tools to teach content to English language learners and develop language proficiency, through respect of skills and interests, while demonstrating value of the individual. These examples provided evidence that all learners were involved in the learning that supported all languages.
Total: 30 points
Assignment # 4 Field Experiences Activity Log (20 points; Due Session 8) (AP-) (InTASC- Learner Development, Content Knowledge, Learner Differences); ESOL 2, 4, 5; NAEYC: 1a, 1b Child development, 2a Families and communities, 4b DAP practices
This activity is intended to provide opportunities to observe children’s behaviors and interactions in different settings. In this activity you will need to conduct the activities listed below.
Field Experience 1:
EC 620 Page 32 of 66 Revised May 2015
o Conduct observations of two infants (one should be a typically developing child). Note their developmental characteristics, ways in which they communicate, and responses to adults. Comment on developmental differences that you observed.
o Interview two parents of infants and toddlers. To the extent possible select one with cultural and linguistic differences. Inquire about their child rearing practices and aspirations for their children (meals and feeding times, child care, and goals for their children).
Field Experience 2:
o Visit the educational materials section of a local library or store and select at least 15 resources (books, toys, recordings, visuals, etc.) that are appropriate for young children (age’s birth-3, 4-5, and 6-8) and which are reflective of cultural diversity. Be sure to identify resources appropriate for children with diverse backgrounds including linguistic differences (ESOL). For each resource, describe the developmental domain it impacts and how it satisfies cultural diversity (ESOL).
Field Experience 3:
o Interview three parents of children ages birth-age 5. Select parents with diverse cultural backgrounds and find out about their views on appropriate nutritional practices. Compare their responses and identify commonalities and differences. Comment on how culture influences nutritional practices. Write a reflective commentary about your experiences.
Field Experience 4
o Using the observation form in Appendix A, observe two infants while interacting with their parents or caregiver. Note the strategies used to support communication and language. Summarize your findings (What was the role of the adult? What strategies were used to promote communication? How effective were these?).
Field Experience 5:
o Arrange to visit a classroom of children ages 3 and 4 and 5-8. Observe and identify any instances where children exhibit any of Gardner’s multiple intelligences.
o Select at least two children of a same age group and conduct one of the Piagetian conservation tasks. Compare your findings and write a reflective commentary about the experience.
Organize your log using the following categories:
? Field Experiences- Include the results, findings, etc. of each of the activities conducted.
? Remember to complete the following demographical information for your observations. The form is located in the Appendix section of the syllabus.
? Reflections- For each field activity, include a written reflection (See Reflection Form in this syllabus). Compile all the field experiences and share in class.
? Summary of experiences: Description of what was learned about children and the process of growth and development. Include comments about how experiences contributed to clarify concepts and gain knowledge about the role of culture in the process of child development. Comment on how the concepts learned inform practices in early childhood education.
EC 620 Page 33 of 66 Revised May 2015
Rubric:
Element
Criteria
Points
Field Experiences
Provides a detailed description about the demographical characteristics of the settings where observations are conducted. Student completed the demographical data form
@ 1point each = 5
Reflective comments
Provides detailed reflections and comments about each of the field experiences (5). Comments highlight the key aspects learned from each of the experiences
@ 2 points each =10
Summative commentary
Includes comments about the overall concepts learned about role of culture in child development and how they inform practice in early childhood education. Provides examples from the field based experiences
5
Total
20
Assignment 5 Participation 5%, Due weekly
Contribute and exhibits active participation in class discussions
(Discussion postings and chats for online students) 4 points
Attends all sessions (including chat sessions) 1 points
5 points
VIII. Standards
Florida:
Florida Department of Education (2010). Competencies and skills required for teacher certification in Florida (15th ed.). Retrieved from http://www.fldoe.org/asp/ftce/ftcecomp.asp
Florida Department of Education (2011). Florida Early Learning and Developmental Standards for Four-Year-Olds. Retrieved from http://www.fldoe.org/earlylearning/perform.asp
EC 620 Page 34 of 66 Revised May 2015
Florida Department of Education (dates vary: 2007-2011). Next Generation Sunshine State Standards. Retrieved from http://www.fldoe.org/bii/Curriculum/SSS/ [Select appropriate subject area.]
Florida Department of Education (2010). Next Generation Sunshine State Standards (Common Core) – English Language Arts. Retrieved from http://www.fldoe.org/bii/Curriculum/SSS/
Florida Department of Education (2010). Next Generation Sunshine State Standards (Common Core) – Mathematics. Retrieved from http://www.fldoe.org/bii/Curriculum/SSS/
Florida Educator Accomplished Practices. (2011). Retrieved from https://www.flrules.org/gateway/notice_Files.asp?ID=9648413
Nevada:
Nevada Department of Education (2008). Standards. Retrieved from http://www.doe.nv.gov/standards.html
National Standards:
Common Core Standards (2012). Retrieved from http://www.corestandards.org/
Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (2011). InTASC model core teaching standards: A resource for state dialogue. Retrieved from http://www.ccsso.org/Documents/2011/InTASC_Model_Core_Teaching_Standards_2011.pdf
National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (2008). The standards. Retrieved from http://www.nbpts.org/the_standards
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (1997-2009). Retrieved from http://www.ncate.org
Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages / National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education Standards (2010). Retrieved from http://www.tesol.org/docs/books/the-revised-tesol-ncate-standards-for-the-recognition-of-initial-tesol-programs-in-p-12-esl-teacher-education-(2010-pdf).pdf?sfvrsn=0
Professional Organization Competencies/Standards:
Council for Exceptional Children (2006-2007). Professional standards. Retrieved from http://www.cec.sped.org/Content/NavigationMenu/ProfessionalDevelopment/ProfessionalStandards/default.htm
EC 620 Page 35 of 66 Revised May 2015
National Association for the Education of Young Children. (2010). NAEYC Standards for Early Childhood Professional Preparation. http://www.naey.org (Position Statements)
IX. CLASS POLICIES
A. Attendance: Students are expected to attend all class sessions.
B. Writing across the Curriculum [Modify or delete, as appropriate]
This course includes written assignments that make up at least one half of the final course grade.
? Written assignments can include, but are not limited to, abstracts, bibliographies, case studies, computer programs, essays, journal entries, lesson plans, literature reviews, project proposals, project reviews, reaction papers, research papers, seminar summaries, and technology reports.
? Remember to use the FSE Standard Format for Assignments, available at: http://www.fischlerschool.nova.edu/Resources/uploads/app/28/files/PDF/fsehs_standard_format.pdf [This includes the format for the title page required with each assignment.]
? Need more assistance with academic writing?
Students can take EDD 8000 Foundations of Graduate Study in Education.
The course is completely voluntary. Check with Student Services for CRNs.
? Help is also available at SharkWrites at http://nova.campusguides.com/FSESharkWrites
I. GRADING CRITERIA
A. Presubmission Checklist: http://www.nova.edu/~yates/FSEHS_Pre_Submission_Checklist.pdf
http://www.nova.edu/~yates/FSEHS_Pre_Submission_Checklist.doc
General Grading Rubric: http://www.fgse.nova.edu/gtep/students/gteprubrics.html
B. Grading Scale:
M.S./Ed.S.
Letter Grade
Percentage
Quality Points
A
91-100
4.0
B+
86-90
3.5
B
80-85
3.0
C
70-79
2.0
F
Below 70
No Credit
Course Assignments and their percentage of the final grade
EC 620 Page 36 of 66 Revised May 2015
Assignment 1- Project on child rearing practices 30%
Assignment 2 – Play presentation 15%
Assignment 3- Developmental lesson plan 30%
Assignment 4 – Field experiences Activity log 20 %
Assignment 5 – Participation 5 %
100%
X. LIST OF SUGGESTED REFERENCES Antliak, S. & Sahin, D. (2010). An observational study for evaluating the effects of interpersonal problem-solving skills training on behavioural dimensions. Early Child Development and Care, 180(8), 995-1003.
Allen, K. E. & Marotz, L. (2011). Developmental profiles: Pre-birth through age eight. NY: Delmar.
Bakeman, R., Adamsom, L., Konner, M. & Barr, R. (1990). !Kung infancy: The social context of object exploration. Child Development, 61, 794-809.
Berk, L. & Winsler, A. (1995). Scaffolding children’s learning: Vygotsky and early childhood education. Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children.
Bodrova, E. (1997). Key concepts of Vigotsky theory of learning and development. Journal of Early Childhood Teacher Education,18, 2, 16-22
Curran, J. (Fall/Winter 1999). Constraints of pretend play: explicit and implicit rules. Journal of Research in Childhood Education, 14(1), 47-55.
Duncan, T., Kemple, K. and Smith, T. (Summer 2000). Reinforcement in developmentally appropriate early childhood classrooms. Childhood Education, 194-199.
Garbarino, J. (1992). Children and their families in the social environment (2nd edition). NY: Aldine de Gruyter.
Gardner, H. (1983). Frames of mind: The theory of multiple intelligences. NY: Basic Books.
Gardner, H. (1993). Multiple intelligences: The theory in practice. NY: Basic Books.
EC 620 Page 37 of 66 Revised May 2015
Gardner, P., Jones, D. and Miner, J. (1994). Social competence among low-income preschoolers: Emotion socialization practices and social cognitive correlates. Child Development, 65, 622-637.
Greenfield, P. & Cocking, R. (2014). Cross-cultural roots of minority child development. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
Kann, R. & Hanna, F. (2000). Disrtuptive behavior disorders in children and adolescents: How do girls differ from boys? Journal of Counseling and Development, 78, 267-274.
Kidlon, D. & Thompson, J. (2000). Raising Cain. Protecting the emotional life of boys. NY: Ballantine.
Konner, M. (1991). Childhood. Multicultural perspectives. Boston, MA: Little, Brown.
Hartup, W. (Fall, 1991). Having friends, making friends, and keeping friends: Relationships as educational contexts. Yearly Report of the University of Minnesota’s Center for early Education and Development, 19 (1). (Eric Digest EDO-PS-92-4)
LaCerva, V. (November 1999). Adverse effects of witnessing violence. Child Care Information Exchange, 44-47. Lau, P. N. (2009). The effects of cooperative learning on preschoolers’ mathematics problem-solving abilities. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 72(3), 307–324.
Lickona, T., Schaps, E. & Lewis, C. (1998, Nov/Dec). Eleven principles of effective character education. Scholastic Early Childhood Today, 53-55.
Lynch, E. & Hanson, M. (2008). Developing cross-cultural competence: A guide for working with young children and their families (3rd edition). Baltimore, MD: Paul Brookes.
Marion, M. (1997). Guiding young children’s understanding and management of anger. Young Children, 52(7), 62-67. Patel, P. & Canobi, K.H. (2010). The role of number words in preschoolers’ addition concepts and problem-solving procedures. Educational Psychology, 30(2), 107-124
Robles de Melendez, W. & Beck, V. (2014). Families in our classrooms: Many ways, many voices (Chapter 3). In Teaching young children in multicultural classrooms. (2nd. Edition). CA: Cengage.
EC 620 Page 38 of 66 Revised May 2015
Roopnarine, J., Jonhnson, J. & Hooper, F. (Eds.). (1994). Children’s play in diverse cultures. NY: SUNY
Simmons, B., Stalsworth, K. and Wentzel, H. (1999). Television violence and its effects on young children. Early Childhood Education Journal, 26(3), 149-153.
Soto, L. (1991). Understanding bilingual/biculural young children. Young Children 46 (2), 30-36.
Skiba, R.; Peterson, R. (Spring 2000). School discipline at a crossroads: from zero tolerance to early response. Exceptional children, 66(3), 335-46.
Stephens, G. (May 1998). Saving the nation’s most precious resources: our children. USA Today, 126 (2636), 54-7.
Trawick-Smith, J. (2004). Early childhood development. A multicultural perspective (4th edition). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill.
Wayman, E., Lynch, E. & Hanson, M. (1990). Home-based childhood services: Cultural sensitivity in a family systems approach. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education 10, 4. Pp. 56-75.
ESOL References:
Delgado-Gaitan, C. (1991). Involving Parents in the Schools: A Process of Empowerment. In American Journal of Education 100(1): 20-46.
Diaz-Rico, L. & Week, K. (2010). The cross-cultural language and academic development handbook: A complete K-12 reference guide (4th ed.). Boston, Allyn and Bacon.
Escamilla, K. (1993). Promoting Biliteracy: Issues in Promoting English Literacy in Students Acquiring English. In The Power of Two Languages: Literacy and Biliteracy for Spanish Speaking Students. New York, NY: Macmillan/McGraw-Hill.
Gay, G. (2000). Culturally responsive teaching. Theory, research, & practice. NY: Teachers College Press.
Herrera, S. & Murry, K. (2005). Mastering ESL and bilingual methods. Differentiated instruction for culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students. Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon.
Pérez, B. & Torres-Guzmán, M. (2002). Learning in two worlds: An integrated Spanish-English/English biliteracy approach (3rd. Ed.). Boston: Allyn and Bacon.
EC 620 Page 39 of 66 Revised May 2015
Faltis, C.J. (1997). Joinfostering: Adapting teaching for multilingual classrooms. Upper Saddle Creek, NJ: Prentice-Hall.
Faltis, C.J., & Hudelson, S.J. (1998). Bilingual education in elementary and secondary school communities. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.
Fueyo, V. (1997). Teaching language-minority students: Using research to inform practice. Equity & Excellence in Education 20 (1), 16-26.
Montes, F. (2002). Enhancing content areas through cognitive language learning collaborative in South Texas. Bilingual Research Journal 26 (3), 697-716.
Nieto, S. (2000). The light in their eyes: Creating multicultural communities. NY: Teachers College Press.
Richard-Amato, P. (1996). Making it happen: Interactions in the second language classroom: From theory to practice. NY: Longman.
Valdes, G. (1996). Con respeto. Bridging the distance between culturally diverse families and schools: An ethnographic portrait. NY: Teachers College.
Zehler, A. (1994). Working with English Language learners. Strategies for elementary and middle school teachers. Available at: http://www.ncela.gwu.edu/pubs/pigs/pig19.htm
Recommended Websites
Early Childhood Research Institute on Measuring Growth and Development (ECRI-MGD)
http://ici2.umn.edu/ecri/
National Child Care Network
http://www.nncc.org/homepage.html
Jean Piaget Society: http://www.piaget.org
March of dimes: http://www.modimes.org/healthlibrary
National Association for the Education of Young Children
http://www.naeyc.org
Social roles: http://curry.edschool.virginia.edu/go/multicultural/activities/boygirl.html
EC 620 Page 40 of 66 Revised May 2015
Social skills: http://www.humsci.auburn.edu/parent/socialskills.html
Special needs: http://seriweb.com
Early Developments (Online Journal)
http://www.fpg.unc.edu/~ncedl/PAGES/ED4.htm
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (http://www.nichd.nih.gov/)
Multiple Intelligences (http://www.indiana.edu/~eric_rec/ieo/bibs/multiple.html)
Brain development (http://www.sfn.org/briefings/parental_care_brain.html)
Diversity and the curriculum (http://www.ericse.org/digests/dse96-1.html)
Standards for effective multicultural pedagogy (http://www.crede.ucsc.edu/Standards/StandIndic/stand_indic.html)
Cooperative learning and diversity (http://www.cde.ca.gov/iasa/cooplrng2.html)
Resources on social skills (http://www.familyvillage.wisc.edu/general/social-skills.html#info)
Peer groups (http://www.apa.org/journals/amp/amp549755.html)
School violence prevention (http://www.mentalhealth.org/schoolviolence/)
Violence and video games (http://www.apa.org/journals/psp/psp784772.html)
American Psychologist (Journal) (http://www.apa.org/journals/)
Vigotsky’ theory
http://snycorva.cortland.edu/~ANDERSMD/VYG/VYG.HTML
C. Websites:
About Education. (2015). Secondary school educators. Retrieved from http://7-12educators.about.com/
CPALMS (2014). Educator toolkits. Retrieved from http://www.cpalms.org/Public/
Family Network on Disabilities. (2015). Retrieved from http://www.fndfl.org/
EC 620 Page 41 of 66 Revised May 2015
Florida Department of Education. (2015). Retrieved from http://www.fldoe.org/
Nevada Department of Education (2012). Retrieved from http://www.doe.nv.gov
Nevada State Parent Information & Resource Center (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.nevadapirc.org
Ohio Assessments for Educators. (2015). Retrieved from http://www.oh.nesinc.com/
Resources for the Florida Standards:
Defining the Core: The Florida Standards. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.definingthecore.com/
Resources for Common Core:
Common Core State Standards Initiative (2015). Core standards. Retrieved from http://www.corestandards.org/the-standards
National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers (NGA & CCSSO). (2010). Common Core State Standards for English language arts & literacy in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects. Washington, DC: National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers. http://www.corestandards.org/assets/CCSSI_ELA%20Standards.pdf
[copy & paste into web browser]
National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers (NGA & CCSSO). (2010). Common Core State Standards for mathematics. Washington, DC: National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers. http://www.corestandards.org/assets/CCSSI_Math%20Standards.pdf [copy & paste into web browser]
Additional Assistance with APA Formatting and Writing:
Alvin Sherman Library, Research, and Information Technology Center (2010).
Help: Style Guides, Citations, and Citing Sources. Retrieved from http://www.nova.edu/library/help/styleguides/styleguides.html
Alvin Sherman Library, Research, and Information Technology Center (2010).Education Tutorial. Retrieved from http://www.nova.edu/library/dils/educationtutorial.html
EC 620 Page 42 of 66 Revised May 2015
American Psychological Association (2015). APA style. Retrieved from http://www.apastyle.org/
American Psychological Association (2014). Basics of APA style tutorial. Retrieved from http://flash1r.apa.org/apastyle/basics/index.htm
American Psychological Association (2015). What’s new in the sixth edition of the publication manual. Retrieved from http://www.apastyle.org/learn/tutorials/brief-guide.aspx
The Iris Center. (n.d.). IRIS modules. Retrieved from http://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/ [Special Education Resources]
The Purdue Online Writing Lab (1995-2011), Retrieved from http://owl.english.purdue.edu/
SharkWrites: The Abraham S. Fischler School of Education Writing Resource Center. (2015). Retrieved from http://sharkwrites.nova.edu/
Warlick, D., & The Landmark Project. (2000–2010). Son of citation machine. Retrieved from http://citationmachine.net/
Template adopted: February, 2005
Template revised: April 17, 2015
EC 620 Page 43 of 66 Revised May 2015
Appendices
EC 620 Page 44 of 66 Revised May 2015
Appendix A
Collection of Demographic Data for Clinical and Field Experiences
To ensure that NSU candidates experience working with P-12 students from diverse backgrounds, programs must systematically track information on placements in clinical and field experiences. NSU candidates, who are already employed in schools, can complete field experiences in their classrooms as long as the P-12 students in the classroom represent diverse populations. NSU accepts the NCATE definition of diversity that follows:
Differences among groups of people and individuals based on ethnicity, race, socioeconomic status, gender, exceptionalities, language, religion, sexual orientation, and geographical area. The types of diversity necessary for addressing the elements on candidate interactions with diverse faculty, candidates, and P–12 students are stated in the rubrics for those elements. (http://www.ncate.org/Standards/NCATEUnitStandards/NCATEGlossary/tabid/477/Default.aspx#D)
In accordance with the NCATE definition, in ASSESS (http://fischlerschool.nova.edu/ASSESS), you will key in demographic information on your placement that is available through the National Center for Educational Statistics. To locate this information:
1. Link to the National Center for Educational Statistics at http://nces.ed.gov/globallocator/.
2. Key in the information for your school. In this example, we will look for information on MAST Academy in Miami-Dade County.
a. Enter Florida for state.
b. Enter MAST Academy for name.
c. Click Search.
3. MAST Academy will appear as the first public school in the results. Click on the link to your school’s name.
4. At the top of the page for MAST Academy, click on the link for More Information.
5. Look at the information for Enrollment Characteristics:
a. Enrollment by Race/Ethnicity
b. Enrollment by Gender
c. Free lunch eligible (at the bottom-left of the page)
d. Reduced-price lunch eligible (at the bottom-right of the page)
6. Log in to ASSESS (http://fischlerschool.nova.edu/ASSESS.
7. Click on the current term.
8. Click on the CRN for this course.
9. Click on the link for Clinical/Field Placement Demographics.
10. Enter the following information for your school. This example has been completed for MAST Academy in Miami-Dade County (Florida). (REMINDER: Click on More Information at the top of the screen.)
EC 620 Page 45 of 66 Revised May 2015
Example:
Enrollment Demographics
Characteristic
Number in School / Type
Name of school
MAST Academy
State of school
Florida
County of school
Miami-Dade
Enrollment
Total students
550
Type of School
Locale (e.g., suburb; large)
Rural: Fringe
Race/Ethnicity
American Indian / Alaskan
1
Asian / Pacific Islander
24
Black
82
Hispanic
299
White
129
Unknown
0
Gender
Female
296
Male
239
Socio-Economic Status
Students qualifying for free lunch
132
Students qualifying for reduced lunch
62
EC 620 Page 46 of 66 Revised May 2015
11. In addition to the categories that NCES provides for all schools in the U.S., there are additional resources in your state for other categories. You may wish to explore this information for your personal interests.
EC 620 Page 47 of 66 Revised May 2015
Format for Assignments
To standardize the presentation of assignments for all courses and programs, a format for student course work has been adopted.
Effective Fall 2004, students will be required to use the following format for all assignments except dissertation documents, for which the Style Guide for the Applied Dissertation is the reference. This guide can be located by accessing the ARO Web site.
Fischler School students are expected to use the following format for all written course assignments:
Title Page Body of Text References
(If other sections are required, an explanation will be provided in the syllabus or course guide.)
Set 1” margins on all sides. Use left margin justification. Set the font for 12 pt with Times New Roman or other readable serif font. Use no bold or underlining. Underlining may be used for linking URLs if requested for certain assignments. Use no running heads or page headers. Use the “Insert” function to insert Arabic page numbers at the upper right corner with the same font as the text (no italics, periods, hyphens, underlining, or bold). Use white paper.
The title page will contain three single-spaced sections, vertically and evenly spaced and centered. It will contain no page number.
? Top section:
Title of the Assignment
Upper and Lower Case Style
? Middle section:
by
Student’s Full Name
Course code and CRN
Title of Course
? Bottom section:
Nova Southeastern University
Month, day, year
EC 620 Page 48 of 66 Revised May 2015
The Body of Text will start with the page number 2.
? Indent ½” for each new paragraph, the default on most word processors.
? Text is to be double-spaced.
? For headings and subheadings, follow current APA style as described in sections 3.31-3.32 of the APA manual.
In the following cases, single-spacing will be used.
o Block quotes
o Table of Contents
o Abstract
o Table titles and figure captions
The References list will start on a new page after the main body; pagination should be continuous throughout the main body and the References section.
The title is to be centered at the top of the page on the first available line (as shown below). The ensuing instructions show how each item will look with hanging indent.
References
For each entry, use a hanging indent and single-spacing. To format a hanging indent in MS Word, click on “Format,” select “Paragraph,” and choose “Indentation”; under “Special,” change to “Hanging.” Double-space between entries.
References are listed in alphabetical order and follow the current APA format. Hanging indent looks like these two instruction items. Appendix pages follow the References list.
EC 620 Page 49 of 66 Revised May 2015
Appendix B
Observation Form
Child’s name____________________ Age___________ (years, months) Date_____________
Time observations started ___________ Time ended______________
Physical Characteristics (overall physical development; gross and fine motor skills)
Social and Emotional (interactions, responses to conflict)
Cognitive (problem solving, math concepts)
Language (oral expressions, communication strategies)
Comments/Notes
EC 620 Page 50 of 66 Revised May 2015
Appendix C
Parent/Family Member and Child Communication Strategies
Observation Form
Child: ___________ Age: _____ Gender _____
Indicate language used by child and adult if different from English ____________ _____________
Setting: ______________________________________
Date: ____________ Time started: _________ Time ended: _______
Observations Communication Strategy Observed:
Motherese:
Labeling:
Recasting:
Expanding:
Echoing:
EC 620 Page 51 of 66 Revised May 2015
Appendix D – Project on Play Behaviors
Observation Form
Child________________ Age_____________ Gender ______________
Date: ___________ Time: From: ___________ to ________________
Setting (describe) __________________________________________ Comments and description of play incident (including reference to toys or any materials used). Indicate participation with and presence of peers or adults. Describe the role and level of interaction with peers or adults. Indicate type of play behaviors observed. Briefly describe the activity. Comments on any literacy events displayed by children (for example: vocalizations, verbalizations, gestural language, expressions, use of language other than English)
Sensorimotor play:
Pretend-play:
Constructive play:
EC 620 Page 52 of 66 Revised May 2015
Comments and description of play incident (including reference to toys or any materials used). Indicate participation with and presence of peers or adults. Describe the role and level of interaction with peers or adults. Indicate type of play behaviors observed. Briefly describe the activity. Comments on any literacy events displayed by children (for example: vocalizations, verbalizations, gestural language, expressions, use of language other than English)
Games:
Notes:
Adapted from: Melendez, W. (2007). Language grows in the classroom. Presentation at the ECA of Florida Annual Conference. Orlando, FL.
EC 620 Page 53 of 66 Revised May 2015
About the Field Experiences
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Nova Southeastern University
Abraham S. Fischler School of Education
Early Childhood Education Program
About the Field Experiences
Field experiences are an integral component of courses in the early childhood education program. They are defined as activities where you will be engaged directly in real life classroom experiences. The field experiences are intended to:
? Develop first-hand experience about the teaching and learning process
? Provide opportunities to apply the knowledge and ideas learned through your courses
? Build the “know-how” in early childhood education
? Experience the link between theory and practice
? Provide experiences and interactions with second language learners and ESOL professionals
? Participate in a variety of school/classroom-based activities
? Interact with children, teachers, and school staff at the school/classroom setting
EC 620 Page 55 of 66 Revised May 2015
? Security Clearance Needed for Field and Clinical Experiences in All Courses ?
Your placement must be coordinated through the Office of Placement Services 800-986-3223 ext. 27900 / 954-262-7900. The placement process is coordinated through University and County officials only. Direct school contact is not permitted.
Nova Southeastern University requires candidates who need to fulfill a clinical or field experience, internship, practicum course requirement in an educational setting to complete the security clearance processes of the school, local school district, and state.
The requirement of a clinical experience may include a background check, drug testing, fingerprinting, etc. For information on these requirements, policies, and procedures, please refer to Obtaining Security Clearance (http://www.fischlerschool.nova.edu/gtep/Obtaining-Security-Clearance) at the Office of Placement Services: http://www.fischlerschool.nova.edu/current-students/office-of-placement-services
Information on the Florida requirements for Background Screening Requirements is provided at http://www.fldoe.org/edstandards/background_screening.asp .
Additional information on ethical standards for teachers of Florida is provided online at the Office of Professional Practices (http://www.fldoe.org/edstandards/).
Directions for Requesting a Field Placement
If a field experience/field-based capstone is required and placement in a school is needed for this course, contact the Office of Placement Services at 954-262-7900 (1-800-986-3223, ext. 27900) to arrange your placement within a school in any given school district (and to get assistance with security clearance). Certain requirements must be met, and they vary from district to district. Further information is available at: http://www.fischlerschool.nova.edu/current-students/how-to-get-a-field-placement
Important! Placements take time to coordinate. Contact this office as soon as possible.
Once You Have Your Placement: Report Demographic Information about Field Experience or Capstone Site
Students completing field experiences and field-based capstones must submit the demographic information about their site in the ASSESS system (http://apps.fischlerschool.nova.edu/oat/login.aspx ). The directions for doing so are provided in Appendix A [indicate where you have included these directions].
Report Your Field Placement Location
Everyone completing a field experience or practicum is required to report their field
EC 620 Page 56 of 66 Revised May 2015
experience location. Once you have completed your field experience, please access http://apps.fse.nova.edu/placementform/placementform.aspx to report your placement information.
Selecting a location for a field experience
There are a variety of locations where conduct field experiences can take place. Course instructors will assist you to identify programs and schools known by the appropriateness of the services offered to children. Check with your local school district about their field experience policies. In early childhood education preference should be given to public schools programs and services. They include among others the following:
? Public schools
? Head Start programs
? Early Start programs
? Hospital-based programs
? Community programs
? Child service agencies
Variety of field experiences
Field Experiences must include a variety of age groups so as to become familiar with teaching and learning with ages three through eight. Assigned field activities require participation and direct interaction in the following type of settings:
? Preschools, Pre-kindergarten, Kindergarten Programs (ages 3, 4, 5)
? Primary age groups (1st, 2nd, 3rd grade classrooms)
? Inclusive classrooms (classrooms serving children with special needs)
? Classrooms serving ESL children
Field Experiences in Classrooms with ESOL students:
Students are expected and required to conduct experiences in classrooms serving children who are English Language Learners. Be sure to select classrooms and setting with ESL programs. Your instructor can guide you to identify appropriate ESL settings.
Forms
The following forms are used when conducting field experiences:
? Introductory letter
EC 620 Page 57 of 66 Revised May 2015
Your instructor will provide you with a Letter of Introduction to be presented at the location where the field experience is to take place. The letter introduces you as a graduate student and explains the purpose of the activity.
? Verification of a field experience
Evidence of completion of field experiences is required for the purposes of the activity and for your portfolio. For each field experience you will need to complete the Verification Form. The form requires to be signed by the early childhood professional who verifies the kind of activity conducted in that location. Contact information (telephone number and/or e-mail address) for the verifier is also required. This information is needed for your instructor to discuss and clarify the activities you conducted.
? Reflective Journal
Becoming a reflective practitioner is an indispensable characteristic of professional educators. After each field activity is completed, it is required that you reflect upon what was learned and “experienced.” The Reflective Journal Form includes questions to facilitate this process.
EC 620 Page 58 of 66 Revised May 2015
EC 620 Page 59 of 66 Revised May 2015
Field Experience Forms
EC 620 Page 60 of 66 Revised May 2015
NOVA SOUTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY
Fischler School of Education
Early Childhood Education Program
Field Experience Reflective Journal
Student’s Name___________________________________________ Course___________
Location (school) __________________________ Grade/Age group______________
Classroom includes ESL children: ___ Yes ___ No
Date _______________Time started________ Time completed______
Objective of field Experience: _________________________________________________________
Journal Comments
About the children, today I….
About the teaching and learning process, I learned….
New ideas learned today are…
About strategies and activities for ESOL children, today I observed …..
EC 620 Page 61 of 66 Revised May 2015
Insights/Questions/Personal Comments:
Comments from Course Instructor:
Signature_____________________________________ Date: _______________________
EC 620 Page 62 of 66 Revised May 2015
Nova Southeastern University
Abraham S. Fischler School of Education
Early Childhood Education Program
TO: ______________________________, Early Childhood Professional
FROM: ______________________________
Course Instructor, NSU
DATE: ______________________________
SUBJECT: Letter of Introduction and Request to Conduct Graduate Field Experience
This is to introduce _______________________________________________, graduate student in the Early Childhood Education program. We are kindly requesting that in order to satisfy requirements for course_____________, this student be allowed to conduct field experiences at your school/program. The student will share a copy of the description of the field experience to be developed. Should you need to discuss the field experiences, I can be reached at _______________.
Your collaboration will greatly be appreciated as it contributes to the professional preparation of early childhood educators.
EC 620 Page 63 of 66 Revised May 2015
Nova Southeastern University
Abraham S. Fischler School of Education
Early Childhood Education Program
FIELD EXPERIENCE VERIFICATION FORM
Student’s Name: _______________________________ E-mail:______________
Course: _________ Date of field experience: ________________
Time started: ___________________________ Time completed: _________________
Purpose of Field Experiences: ______________________________________________
School /Center/Program __________________________________________________
Age Group: ____________________
Describe the type of activity conducted:
Observations and Participation with School Professionals
Interactions
with Children
Activities with ESOL children and professionals
Comments about activities
EC 620 Page 64 of 66 Revised May 2015
EC 620 Page 65 of 66 Revised May 2015
Verification:
I, _________________________________________________,
(Please indicate your name and position)
Verify that _________________________________, an early childhood graduate student at NSU, completed the following activities at my program:
Comments:
Signature of verifier: _________________________________________
Date: _____________________________________________
Telephone number: _______________________________
Email: ___________________
EC 620 Page 66 of 66 Revised May 2015