Single-Letter and Consonant Digraphs

Teacher: “Today we listened to “Birthday Soup” from the book Little Bear. He is making soup for his friends in a pot with some peas. Pot and peas begin with the same sound: the /p/ sound. Watch my mouth /p/. You say /p/.”

Students: “/p/”

Teacher: Show students the large letter p card. Say, “Tdsewfhis is the letter p. The letter p stands for the /p/ sound in pot and peas. Say /p/.”

Students: “/p/”

Teacher: “Every time I touch the letter p, say /p/.” Touch the letter p card several times.

Students: “/p/”
Students: “/p/”
Students: “/p/”
Teacher:

Student:

Short Vowel Teacher:

Student:
Long Vowel Teacher:

Student:

Word Building

Teacher:

Student:
Word Building -Spelling

Teacher:

Student:

Scripting dialogues between teacher and student is a strategy used to intentionally teach the integration of written and spoken language. Scripted dialogues are used in a variety of contexts, and are especially helpful when students are practicing phonics, word recognition, and spelling.
Part 1: Scripting Dialogues Table
Using the “Scripting Dialogues Table” with the “Birthday Soup” excerpt, create teacher‐student dialogues specific to using single‐letter and consonant digraphs, short vowel and long vowel sounds, and appropriate use of word building and word building‐spelling.
Part 2: Rationale
In a 250‐500 word rationale, summarize how each dialogue is effective and developmentally appropriate for teaching phonics, word recognition, and spelling.
Explain how you will use your findings in your future professional practice.
Support your findings with 2‐3 scholarly sources.