Sustainable Solutions Paper Proposal

Sustainable Solutions Paper Proposal;

(Section 1) Identifying your Organization
Begin by thinking about the organization you have chosen that encompasses both the concept of sustainability and the need to apply strategic thinking. Please refer to the handout, “Sustainable Solutions Paper—Identifying a Potential Organization” for specific guidance on identifying an organization for your Sustainable Solutions Paper.

In your Proposal, identify the organization you have selected and place it in context; then specify its relevance for study, providing supporting evidence as needed. Your initial proposal should be approximately two substantive paragraphs.

Research and references for this section
Book: Harvard Business School Press. (2005). Strategy: Create and implement the best strategy for your business. Boston, MA: Author.
•    Introduction
•    Chapter 1, “SWOT Analysis I: Looking Outside for Threats and Opportunities” p. 1-15
•    Chapter 2, “SWOT Analysis II: Looking Inside for Strengths and Weaknesses” p. 17-28
•    Chapter 3, “Types of Strategy: Which Fits Your Business?” p. 29-46
•    Chapter 4, “Strategic Moves: The Mechanisms of Success” p. 48-60
•    Chapter 5, “From Strategy to Implementation: Seeking Alignment” p. 61-75

Book: Senge, P., Smith, B., Kruschwitz, N., Laur, J., & Schley, S. (2010).The necessary revolution: How individuals and organizations are working together to create a sustainable world. New York, NY: Doubleday.
•    Chapter 1, “A Future Awaiting Our Choices”
•    Chapter 9, “Positioning for the Future and the Present”
•    Chapter 11, “Building Your Case for Change”

Articles
•    Porter, M.E. & Millar, V.E. (1985). How information gives you competitive advantage. Harvard Business Review, 63(4), 149-161. Retrieved from ABI/Inform Global database.
•    NetMBA.com. (2007). The value chain. Retrieved December 5, 2008, from http://www.netmba.com/strategy/value-chain
•    Freemen, R. E, Gilbert, Jr. D. R., & Hartman, E. (1988). Values and the foundations of strategic management. Journal of Business Ethics, 7(11), 821-834. Retrieved from Business Source Premier database.
•    Kaplan, R. S. & Norton, D. P. (2008). Mastering the management system. Harvard Business Review, 86(1), 62-77. Retrieved from Business Source Premier database.
•    Mintzberg, H., & Hunsicker, J. Q. (1988). Crafting strategy. McKinsey Quarterly, 3, 71-90. Retrieved from Business Source Premier database.
•    Porter, M. E. (2008). The five competitive forces that shape strategy. Harvard Business Review, 86(1), 78-93. Retrieved from Business Source Premier database.
Handouts/Study Notes
•    Integrated Essay Guidelines
•    Sustainable Solutions Paper — Identifying a Potential Organization
•    Freeman, R. E. & McVea, J. (2001). A stakeholder approach to strategic management. Retrieved December 4, 2008, from http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=263511
•    How to Prepare an Annotated Bibliography Entry
•    Handout: The Resource Transformation Process & Competitive Advantage: A Detailed, Process-Oriented Typology of Organizational Resources & Implications for SWOT Analysis

(Section 2) Applying Traditional Strategic Thinking Tools
Apply traditional strategic thinking tools in this section of the paper.
Please see the handout, Sustainable Solutions Paper—Applying Strategic Thinking Tools, Part I, for a fuller description of the following required traditional framing analyses:
• Stakeholder Identification and Value Analysis
• General Force Analysis
• Porter’s Five-Forces Industry Analysis
• Detailed Value Chain Analysis
• Detailed SWOT/SCOT Analysis
• Key Success Factors: Integrating the Analysis

Be sure to continue using the template: SSP Template. For more information about the final SSP deliverable, please review the Sustainable Solutions Paper Application Rubric, presented as a separate attachment.

Research and references for this section
Book: Harvard Business School Press. (2005). Strategy: Create and implement the best strategy for your business. Boston, MA: Author.
•    Chapter 6, “Action Plans: The Architecture of Implementation” p. 77-94
•    Chapter 7, “How to Stay on Course: Sensing and Responding to Deviations from Plan” p. 95-108
•    Chapter 8, “The People Side of Implementation: Getting the Right People on Board” p. 109-120
•    Chapter 9, “Strategy as Work-in-Progress: Keep Looking Ahead” p. 121-136

Book: Stacey, R. (2013). Strategic management and organisational dynamics: The challenge of complexity (Laureate Education, Inc., custom ed.). Essex, England: Pearson Education Limited.
•    Chapter 4, “Thinking in Terms of Strategic Choice: Cybernetic Systems, Cognitivist and Humanistic Psychology” p. 64-97
•    Chapter 5, “Thinking in Terms of Organisational Learning and Knowledge Creation: Systems Dynamics, Cognitivist, Humanistic and Constructivist Psychology” p. 98-125
•    Chapter 7, “Thinking About Strategy Process from Systematic Perspective: Using a Process to Control a Process” p.148-171

Articles
•    Hamel, G., & Prahalad, C. K. (2005). Strategic intent. Harvard Business Review, 83(7-8). Retrieved from Business Source Premier database.
Porter, M. E. (1996). What is strategy?. Harvard Business Review, 74(6), 61-78. Retrieved from Business Source Premier database.
•    Wheeler, D., Colbert, B., & Freeman, R. E. (2003). Focusing on value: Reconciling corporate social responsibility, sustainability and a stakeholder approach in a network world. Journal of General Management, 28(3), 1-28. Retrieved from Business Source Premier database.
•    Mintzberg, H., & Lampel, J. (1999). Reflecting on the strategy process. Sloan Management Review, 40(3), 21-30. Retrieved from Business Source Premier database.
•    Chang, D. S. & Sun, K. L. (2007). Exploring the correspondence between total quality management and Peter Senge’s disciplines of a learning organization: A Taiwan perspective. Total Quality Management & Business Excellence, 18(7), 807-822. Retrieved from Business Source Premier database.
•    Kunsch, P. L., Theys, M., & Brans, J. P. (2007). The importance of systems thinking in ethical and sustainable decision-making. Central European Journal of Operations Research, 15(3), 253-269. Retrieved from Business Source Premier database.
•    Mintzberg, H. (1990). The design school: Reconsidering the basic premises of strategic management. Strategic Management Journal, 11(3), 171-195. Retrieved from Business Source Premier database.
•    Mintzberg, H. (1994). The fall and rise of strategic planning. Harvard Business Review, 72(1), 107-114. Retrieved from Business Source Premier database.
•    Porter, M. E. (2008). The five competitive forces that shape strategy. Harvard Business Review, 86(1), 78-93. Retrieved from Business Source Premier database

Handouts/Study Notes
•    Sustainable Solutions Paper—Applying Strategic-Thinking Tools, Part I
•    Sustainable Solutions Paper—Applying Strategic-Thinking Tools, Part II
•    How to Prepare an Annotated Bibliography Entry

(Section 3) Extending and Re-Framing the Sustainable Solutions Paper
Apply your understanding of organizations as complex adaptive systems, expanding the scale and scope of your analysis for your Sustainable Solutions Paper.
Please see the detailed handout titled, “Sustainable Solutions Paper—Complexity Analysis,” for a fuller description of the following required systems expansion analyses:
•    Fitness Landscape Translation Analysis
•    Boid Analysis: Rules for your topic?
•    Ray’s Simulation Translation & Fishing Simulation Translation: Industry Evolution Modeling
Be sure to continue using the template SSP Template. For more information about the final SSP deliverable, please review the Sustainable Solutions Paper Application Rubric

Research and references for this section
Book: Stacey, R. (2013). Strategic management and organisational dynamics: The challenge of complexity (Laureate Education, Inc., custom ed.). Essex, England: Pearson Education Limited.
•    Chapter 10, “The Complexity Sciences: The Sciences of Uncertainty” p. 234-261
•    Chapter 11, “Systemic Applications of Complexity Sciences to Organisations: Restating the Dominant Discourse” p. 262-295

Book: Senge, P., Smith, B., Kruschwitz, N., Laur, J., & Schley, S. (2010).The necessary revolution: How individuals and organizations are working together to create a sustainable world. New York, NY: Doubleday.
•    Chapter 2, “How We Got into This Predicament” p. 14-32
•    Chapter 3, “Life Beyond the Bubble” p. 33-41
•    Chapter 4, “New Thinking, New Choices” p. 42-56
•    Chapter 8, “Risks and Opportunities: The Business Rationale for Sustainability” p. 101-118
•    Chapter 9, “Positioning for the Future and the Present” p. 119-139
•    Chapter 16, “Convening: Get the System in the Room” p. 234-249
Chapter 19, “Innovation Inspired by Living Systems” p. 285-291
•    Chapter 20, “Unleashing Everyday Magic” p. 292-301
•    Chapter 22, “From Low-Hanging Fruit to New Strategic Possibilities” p. 310-323

Articles
•    Carlisle, Y., & McMillan, E. (2006). Innovation in organizations from a complex adaptive systems perspective. Emergence: Complexity & Organization, 8(1), 2-9. Retrieved from Business Source Premier database.
•    Lichtenstein, B. B., Uhl-Bien, M., Marion, R., Seers, A., Orton, J. D., & Schreiber, C. (2006). Complexity leadership theory: An interactive perspective on leading in complex adaptive systems. Emergence: Complexity & Organization, 8(4), 2-12. Retrieved from Business Source Premier database.
•    Morçöl, G. (2005). A new systems thinking: implications of the sciences of complexity for public policy and administration. Public Administration Quarterly, (3), 297-320. Retrieved from ABI/INFORM Global database.
•    Plowman, D. A., Baker, L. T., Beck, T. E., Kulkarni, M., Solansky, S. T., & Travis, D. V. (2007). Radical change accidentally: The emergence and amplification of small change. Academy of Management Journal, 50(3), 515-543. Retrieved from Business Source Premier database.
•    Senge, P. M., Lichtenstein, B. B., Kaeufer, K., Bradbury, H., & Carroll, J. S. (2007). Collaborating for systemic change. MIT Sloan Management Review, 48(2), 44-53. Retrieved from ABI/INFORM Global database.
•    Boons, F. (2008). Self-organization and sustainability: The emergence of a regional industrial ecology. Emergence: Complexity & Organization, 10(2), 41-48. Retrieved from Business Source Premier database.
•    King, M. C. (2008). What sustainability should mean. Challenge, 51(2), 27-39. Retrieved from Business Source Premier database.
•    Mabin, V. J., Davies, J., & Cox, J. F. (2006). Using the theory of constraints thinking processes to complement system dynamics’ causal loop diagrams in developing fundamental solutions. International Transactions in Operational Research, 13(1), 33-57. Retrieved from Business Source Premier database.
•    Pearce, O. (2008). Holistic assessment of sustainability and its application at Halcrow. Journal of Corporate Citizenship, 30, 37-65. Retrieved from Business Source Premier database.
•    Aguilera, R. V., Rupp, D. E., Williams, C. A., & Ganapathi, J. (2007). Putting the S back in corporate social responsibility: A multilevel theory of social change in organizations. Academy of Management Review, 32(3), 836-863. Retrieved from Business Source Premier database.
•    Leuenberger, D. (2006). Sustainable development in public administration: A match with practice? Public Works Management & Policy, 10(3), 185-201. Retrieved from Business Source Premier database.
•    Rusinko, C. A. (2005). Using quality management as a bridge to environmental sustainability in organizations. SAM Advanced Management Journal, 70(4), 54-60. Retrieved from Business Source Premier database.
•    Senge, P., & Carstedt, G. (2001). Innovating our way to the next industrial revolution. MIT Sloan Management Review, 42(2), 24-38. Retrieved from Business Source Premier database.
•    Shrivastava, P. (1993). Crisis theory/practice: Towards a sustainable future. Organization & Environment, 7(1), 23-42. Retrieved from Management & Organization Studies: A SAGE Full-Text Collection database.

Handouts/Study Notes
•    Sustainable Solutions Paper—Complexity Analysis
•    Sustainable Solutions Paper—Systems and Sustainability Analysis
•    How to Prepare an Annotated Bibliography Entry

Final Instructions
The primary formal deliverable in this course is the analysis and writing of a Sustainable Solutions Paper, which has been designed so that you can apply your understanding of strategic thinking, systems thinking, complexity analysis, and sustainability analysis to an organization of your choice. Your final paper will utilize approximately 20 sources and follow APA format. The minimum page length is 40 and the maximum page length is 60 pages. for your final solutions paper. For more information about your final deliverable, please review the Sustainable Solutions Paper area, located under the Course Introduction. This Application requires the use of the template located in Doc Sharing: DDBA8160 SSP Template. Also review the Sustainable Solutions Paper Application Rubric, located in the Rubrics area.
This week, having already posted your executive summary and draft to the Discussion and reviewed your colleagues’ feedback, you will make final revisions to your Sustainable Solutions Paper. Submit your final paper by Day 7.