Synthesis of Theory

Task One:
Synthesis of Theory. You will need to answer the following in a well-constructed essay (2 pages). Please make sure to answer the questions fully (e,g., that each sub –question is answered ).
Employing the French and Raven typology from Unit 8 (Both unit 8 key concepts and French and Raven typology are attached) , discuss the relative merits and usefulness to educators of expert and/or referent authority in their relations with students, peers, and administrators, and the relative disadvantages and difficulties associated with reward and/or coercive authority. Reinforce your points with examples from your own experience or from observations of current events, from other settings you’re acquainted with, etc. Cite course readings ( Breinin and Carpenter ) and concepts to enrich. (As I mentioned before I don’t have my own classroom yet, therefore for example, I only refer to my student teaching experience ,practicum experiences (observing other teachers ), and my experience as interventionist.

Task Two
Evaluation of U.S. Education via Readings. You will need to answer the following question in another well-constructed essay (2 pages). Please make sure to answer the questions fully (e,g., that each sub –question is answered ).

In Unit 3, we reviewed the “accountability” era (Unit 3 attached) . You read articles by Tamim Ansary and additional news stories and reports by Shrag, Carpernter, and Clines, all of which characterize conditions in the so-called “accountability” movement . This essay should take the form of a letter to a legislator who is calling for more rigorous standards and testing in light (he argues) of the “clear evidence” that “teachers have been malfeasant” by “failing to fulfill the obligations to which they are supposed to have committed themselves in schools.” Use evidence from the Ansary reading to bolster your case in appealing to the legislator, and site brief examples from the Shrag, Carpenter, and Clines of ways that the “accountability” movement is actually eroding—not strengthening—public