The mythological character of Oedipus

The mythological character of Oedipus, whom Sophocles represents so memorably in Oedipus Tyrannous (Oedipus the King/Oedipus Rex) and Oedipus at Colon’s, can be viewed as a heroic figure. Compare Oedipus as a hero to these other heroes in Greek myth; Herakles, Perseus, Theseus, Jason, Achilles and Odysseus. What elements of Oedipus’s narrative overlap with a traditional heroic narrative? How does Sophocles vary, expand upon, and challenge more traditional versions of a hero’s journey or life? Is Oedipus even a hero? The most successful responses to this question will incorporate both an accurate and detailed rehearsal of Oedipus’s narrative and also a thoughtful analysis of this narrative within the context of Greek myth and culture.

Women, in some crucial ways, drive  the narrative of the Iliad and the Trojan War.      Please  comment on how literature and myth  represent pivotal female figures such   as,     Helen, Chryseis, Briseis, Andromache, Polyxena, and Cassandra.  Be sure to  contextualize your answers, in other words, only the    Iliad provides  detailed    characterisations of Chryseis   and Briseis, so their representations form important    elements of the Iliad’s own narrative,  while also participating in wider concepts of   the female.  Do certain concepts unite the  representations of these women? Does one stand  out as  slightly different, and why might that be? The most successful responses to this    question will incorporate evidence of knowledge of  the basic narratives of the various     figures, and also a thoughtful  analysis of the female  within  the context of  Greek   myth    and culture.    

All of the heroes in ancient Greek myth encounter “the other” (generally this might mean    non-Greeks, monsters, and women, combinations; there may be other variants) as part of  their narratives. Please discuss the various representations of “the other” in the myths of     Herakles, Perseus, Theseus, Jason, and Odysseus.    Does Achilles   meet an “other”?    What happens in these interactions? What do the representations of “the other” tell us  about Greek culture?    The most successful responses to this question will incorporate     evidence of knowledge of the basic  narratives of the various figures, and  also a  thoughtful analysis of  “the other” within the context of Greek myth and culture.