The Sexual Politics of Sickness

Question #1 (2-3 pages) In Complaints and Disorders: The Sexual Politics of Sickness, Ehrenreich and English explore some of the ways in which social class intersects with race and gender with regard to assumptions, ideas, and actions within the 19th and 20th century U.S. medical professions. First: Please provide a minimum of three examples that illustrate the biologically determinist assumptions and actions of the U.S. medical profession with regard to 1.) upper and upper-middle class women (3 examples) and 2.) lower-class and poor women (3 examples). In other words, please explain at least three ways the U.S. medical professions have explained and/or treated upper-class women and three ways the U.S. medical professions have explained and/or treated lower-class women from a biologically determinist standpoint. (Total of six examples).
Question #2 (2-3 pages) We’ve been reading Marge Piercy’s science fiction work: Woman on the Edge of Time throughout the semester. As you know, Piercy’s novel is centered around Connie and her experiences in and out of medical institutions. The novel toggles between a dystopic present day reality and a version of utopia in the future. First: Do you find Piercy’s version of a possible future (the attitudes, behaviors, social structures, norms etc. found in the future she describes) compelling? That is, are there elements in Piercy’s imagined future that you find worth aiming for? Why or why not? On the contrary, are there elements of this future that you find less or not at all appealing? If yes, what and why? If no, why not?