Why Killers Kill

Why Killers Kill

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Essay 2: Perspectives in Argumentation
For Essay 2, you will research the topic you chose for Essay 1. However, while Essay 1 was a narrative from your own brain, Essay 2 will be based ENTIRELY on research. For this essay, your job is not to make an argument but to see what arguments are out there. What are the different perspectives on this topic? There is no topic on which EVERYONE agrees, so what are the different sides on this one?
Research Requirements: You need to have AT LEAST five sources. At least two of them should be primary sources, as defined on page 351 of The Little, Brown Compact Handbook. At least one of them should be a scholarly source, as defined on page 352 of the handbook. You should have a mixture of sources, both impartial and biased, as described on pages 352 and 353 in the handbook. While some sources WILL be biased, be sure to balance them out with other sources that take a different perspective.
Note: You will not agree with everything that goes into your essay. Writing it in your essay does not mean you believe it. It means that people who look at the topic from a different perspective think this.
Follow this basic outline:
Thesis: Topic and purpose of essay
I. Background information – statistics, history, location, range, etc. (facts)
II. Major Point I
A. Supporting detail
B. Supporting detail
III. Major Point 2
A. Supporting detail
B. Supporting detail
IV. Major Point 3
A. Supporting detail
B. Supporting detail
V. Major Point 4 (optional)
A. Supporting detail
B. Supporting detail
VI. Major Point 5 (optional)
A. Supporting detail
B. Supporting detail
You have a couple of options regarding how you fill in this outline.
1. Each major point may be naming a different perspective, and each supporting detail may be a different component of what people from that perspective use to make their argument.
2. OR each major point may be a different aspect of this topic, and each supporting detail may tell how people from different perspectives respond to that aspect.

Introduction: In the textbook (The Longman Writer), you will find an overview of types of introductions on pp. 67 – 69. You may use whichever type fits your essay; however, I would like to see you use something that connects Essay 1 and Essay 2. For example, if you use “Series of Short Questions,” those questions may be the ones asked by the victim in Essay 1. Or if you use “Brief Anecdote,” the story you tell could be that of the victim from Essay 1.
Conclusion: You may not reach a clear conclusion on the topic. Therefore, in the last paragraph, I want you to highlight what you have learned since you completed Essay 1. Answer one or more of the following questions:
1. Did you find what you thought you would find?
2. Did you find any perspectives that you did not know were out there?
3. Were you surprised by any of the information people used to support their opinions?
4. Did you come to understand a different perspective better – not to say that you now AGREE with that perspective, just that you UNDERSTAND it better?
5. Which perspective do you most agree with and why?
6. If you could go back and rewrite Essay 1, what would you change, add, or develop?
7. Did you come across any solutions that you think would work?
8. Was there anything that all (or most) people agreed on?
Formatting: Your essay should follow MLA format and should have 1,000 to 1,500 words. It should have a Works Cited page and careful internal citation. It should be written in third person using a scholarly, unbiased tone – you are presenting your findings, not agreeing or disagreeing with them. The ONLY paragraph that may include first person and opinion is the conclusion.