Myers and Miller

1. Carefully read and annotate both essays: Myers (p. 141-158) and Miller (p. 172-182) and then begin the brainstormingprocess by summarizing the main message (or thesis) of each writer in the spaces below. Jot down the
important supporting ideas that contribute to each writer’s thesis:
Myers
“Evidence and the Projects of Rationality”
Miller
“Finding Darwin’s God
Thesis: (Write a 1-3 sentence summary of the author’s main
idea or position in the article)
Thesis:
Supporting ideas:
2. After carefully considering each writer’s ideas separately (this is called ‘analysis’), you are now ready to consider
how these ideas relate to each other (‘synthesis’). A very common form of synthesis writing is ‘compare –
contrast’. In this type of writing you look for both similarities (where do the ideas overlap? Where do you see
points of agreement between the two writers?) and differences (where do they disagree? How do they differ
from each other?). Jot down some ideas in the space below:
Similarities Differences
3. Prioritize: now choose the three ideas that you find the most interesting, compelling, or important in each
category. You will write one RTW paragraph about the similarities, and one paragraph about the differences.
Briefly name the 3 similarities and the 3 differences you will write about:
a. Similarities:
b. Differences:
4. Think about an effective way to organize these ideas into a two-paragraph essay. You can begin either with the
similarities paragraph or the differences paragraph. Write a Topic Sentence for the first paragraph:
5. Now complete the three CER sets for the first paragraph: each Claim sentence will name one of the similarities
or differences. The Evidence will be a direct quotation from one of the articles. The Rationale further explains
the relationship of these ideas.
——————————————————————————————————————————————————-
CLAIM 1:
EVIDENCE 1:
RATIONALE 1:
———————————————————————————————————————————————————–
CLAIM 2:
EVIDENCE 2:
RATIONALE 2:
——————————————————————————————————————————————————-
CLAIM 3:
EVIDENCE 3:
RATIONALE 3:
———————————————————————————————————————————————————
Concluding Sentence for the first paragraph:
6. Now, repeat the process for the second paragraph:
Topic Sentence:
CLAIM 1:
EVIDENCE 1:
RATIONALE 1:
———————————————————————————————————————————————————–
CLAIM 2:
EVIDENCE 2:
RATIONALE 2:
——————————————————————————————————————————————————-
CLAIM 3:
EVIDENCE 3:
RATIONALE 3:
———————————————————————————————————————————————————
Concluding Sentence for the second paragraph:
7. Finally, pull the sentences into two complete paragraphs, with transitions introducing each Claim. Consider
using transitional phrases such as, “A second way these writers relate to each other is . . . “ or “Finally, a way
these writers disagree is . . . “
8. Include a citation for both articles; organize them alphabetically by last name (Miller before Myers). Refer to
either the APA or MLA citation guide for how to cite articles in an anthology.